Remove Cat Urine Odor - Vet’s Advice On Remove Cat Urine Odor

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What is the best way to remove cat urine odor?

One of the most common client questions I get from cat owners is "How do I remove cat urine odor"? This is a terrible dilemma for any cat owner with a cat urinating outside of the litter box and especially those with multi-cat household where more than one cat may be involved. It is important to address this problem of cat urine odor in two ways. First, recognize the behavioral problem and try to determine the source of the problem. Secondly, address how best to remove the cat urine odor. For the first problem, we have a really good article on Petplace.com about reasons why your cat may not be using the litter box. I recommend that you read this carefully as you work concurrently on how best to remove cat urine odor click here.


As far as how to remove cat urine odor, figure out where your cat is "going". Is it one spot or multiple spots? If the area is wet – sop up as much of the liquid as possible with plain paper towels. Once it is as "dry" as it can get, use a proprietary product that enzymatically breaks down the urine odor molecule. Use a good quality product and DON'T SKIMP. Use as directed. The products often recommend saturating the area in a way that may seem "extreme". Do it. The cat urine will often go down to the pad or baseboard in carpets and you need for the product being used to remove cat urine odor to do the same. Remember, this is not a time to skimp. Use the products as directed. Some of my favorite products include: Zero Odor, Urine-off, Nature's Miracle, SeaYu Petrotech Odor Eliminator, Anti Icky Poo (AIP), Odorban, Odornil, and Nilodor..

Dr. Debra


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debra-primovic Dr. Debra Primovic

Debra A. Primovic, BSN, DVM, Editor-in-Chief, is a graduate of the Ohio State University School of Nursing and the OSU College of Veterinary Medicine. Following her veterinary medical training, Dr. Primovic practiced in general small animal practices as well as veterinary emergency practices. She was staff veterinarian at the Animal Emergency Clinic of St. Louis, Missouri, one of the busiest emergency/critical care practices in the United States as well as MedVet Columbus, winner of the AAHA Hospital of the year in 2014. She also spends time in general practice at the Granville Veterinary Clinic. Dr. Primovic divides her time among veterinary emergency and general practice, editing, writing, and updating articles for PetPlace.com, and editing and indexing for veterinary publications. She loves both dogs and cats but has had extraordinary cats in her life, all of which have died over the past couple years. Special cats in her life were Kali, Sammy, Pepper and Beanie.