PetPlace.com Soft Palate Disorders in Cats - Page 2

My Pet: FREE Tools to Care for Your Pet and Connect with Others


Over 10,000 Vet Approved Articles Search All Articles

Soft Palate Disorders in Cats

By: Dr. Nicholas Trout

Read By: Pet Lovers
Email To A Friend Print
Clefts of the soft palate should be distinguished from clefts involving the hard palate alone (although they can be in conjunction with hard palate clefts) and clefts involving the lips and nostrils, a primary cleft or harelip. The latter is usually easy to define on physical examination.

Traumatic clefts should be distinguished from congenital clefts. Traumatic clefts may not have a defined history of trauma, but they usually occur in older, active, outdoor animals. Traumatic clefts can occur after falling from a height.

Since congenital clefts of the soft palate are frequently associated with nasal discharge, other causes of rhinitis, or inflammation of the mucus membrane of the nose, should be considered, such as bacterial or viral disorders or inhalation of a foreign body.

The presence of a mass like an abscess or tumor on the soft palate, the larynx or the trachea can mimic the noise of an elongated soft palate and should be considered, especially in an older dog or non-brachycephalic breed.

Cats with nasopharngeal polyps can exhibit upper airway noise similar to an elongated soft palate due to the presence of a polyp in the back of the throat.

Comment & Share
Email To A Friend Print
Keep reading! This article has multiple pages.

Cat Photos Enjoy hundreds of beautiful cat photos Let's Be Friends Follow Us On Facebook Follow Us On twitter

Close

Email to a Friend

Article to eMail
Soft Palate Disorders in Cats




Thanks!
Close
My Pet
Coming Soon

Tools to Care for Your Pet and
Connect with Others!

Be the First to Know.
Notify Me