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Basset Hound

Basset Hound Made popular by the "Hush Puppy" shoe advertisements, the basset hound is one of the most recognizable dogs in the United States. A droopy faced sad looking dog, and loveable but stubborn, the basset is an excellent hunter with scenting ability second only to the bloodhound.

History and Origin

The basset hound is thought to have descended from the old St. Hubert hounds of France. The friars of the French Abbey in St. Hubert needed a dog that could hunt badgers and, through careful and selective breeding, developed the ancestors of the basset hound we know today. Bred to be low to the ground, the dog was called "basset" from the French word "bas" which means low.

The breed was not known anywhere but in France until the mid 1800s. At that point, the basset was imported to England and slowly gained popularity through the world. In 1885, the basset was accepted to the American Kennel Club.

Appearance and Size

The basset is a medium sized dog with long, pendulous ears that puppies tend to trip over. The muzzle is also long and the skin loose and wrinkled. The hair coat is short and comes in a variety of colors – most often a combination of black, brown and white. The legs are short and often quite crooked and angular in appearance with big feet.

The adult basset stands around 14 inches at the shoulder and weighs 40 to 50 pounds.

Personality

Bassets are a gentle and loving breed but can be quite stubborn. They are known for having a strong will and, if reprimanded, may even sulk. Bassets are rarely nervous or high strung and aggression is uncommon.

Home and Family Relations

The basset's naturally placid and calm demeanor makes him great with children. They may look like lazy dogs but they are quite energetic and have no trouble keeping up with active children. Though their lack of aggression makes them poor guard dogs, their bark is very penetrating and can scare off potential intruders.

Training

Bassets are excellent hunters, and their hunting instincts may take over and distract them from the task at hand. They are commonly used to hunt rabbits in the United States but are also used to flush out badgers, foxes, raccoons, opossums, pheasants and squirrels. Even though they excel in training as hunters, bassets don't do too well with obedience. Their stubborn nature takes over. Above all else, they would rather be hunting.

Special Concerns

Basset hounds require open spaces and plenty of exercise to prevent behavioral problems. Hunter at heart, bassets should not be allowed to roam free. If they see a squirrel or rabbit, they lose sight of everything else and consequently have the potential to get injured, especially when chasing across a busy street. If kept confined to a small area outdoors, the basset will likely dig his way out of the enclosure.








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