PetPlace.com Allergic Dermatitis in Dogs - Page 6

My Pet: FREE Tools to Care for Your Pet and Connect with Others


Over 10,000 Vet Approved Articles Search All Articles

Allergic Dermatitis in Dogs

By: Dr. Erika DePapp

Read By: Pet Lovers
Email To A Friend Print
Optimal treatment for your pet involves a combination of home and professional veterinary care. Follow-up can be critical, especially if your pet does not rapidly improve. Administer all prescribed medications as directed. Alert your veterinarian if you are having problems treating your pet.

Re-exams by your veterinarian may be required every 2-4 weeks, at least initially, to monitor efficacy of the treatment plan. Once the dermatitis is well controlled, certain drugs may be tapered or discontinued. This decision should only be made by your veterinarian. If signs are seasonal, medication may only be required at certain times of the year. Any flare-ups of dermatitis should be addressed early, as clinical signs may worsen quickly if not treated appropriately.

For patients taking corticosteroids, certain side effects are to be expected; dogs will drink and urinate more than normal, may pant, and may have an increased appetite. Adverse effects of this therapy may also include gastrointestinal upset and even bleeding or ulcer formation. This may manifest as vomiting, diarrhea, dark and tarry stools or general weakness. Any of these adverse effects should be brought to the attention of your veterinarian immediately.


Comment & Share
Email To A Friend Print
Keep reading! This article has multiple pages.

Dog Photos Enjoy hundreds of beautiful dog photos Let's Be Friends Follow Us On Facebook Follow Us On twitter

Close

Email to a Friend

Article to eMail
Allergic Dermatitis in Dogs




Thanks!
Close
My Pet
Coming Soon

Tools to Care for Your Pet and
Connect with Others!

Be the First to Know.
Notify Me