Best Christmas Themed Dog Names

Christmas is just around the corner, and that means celebrating the holidays with friends and family. And for most, that includes furry family members as well. It may not surprise you to hear that Christmas is one of the busiest adoption times of the year for shelters and breeders. But sadly, after the holidays end, some shelters enter into their most active intake season, taking in pets after the holiday cheer has faded.

This Christmas season, we’re dedicated to helping more dogs find their forever homes than ever before. We agree that the holidays can be an excellent time to bring home a new furry family member; when one is fully prepared. Those who are taking a few days off from work can give their new puppy the time and attention it needs to feel happy in its new home. With the right preparation, you can make this holiday season merry for both the humans and pets in your life.

Are You Ready For A Christmas Puppy

We are in no way discouraging people from bringing home a new puppy for Christmas. We fully support adopting or bringing home a puppy from a breeder around the holidays; we just want to make sure that our readers are fully aware of the realities that go along with bringing home a puppy for Christmas. Three of the most prominent hurdles that we’re trying to help new puppy owners overcome this holiday season are puppy-proofing, basic puppy needs, and holiday safety. Each hurdle can present a serious obstacle, and if not taken care of, can result in a very not-merry Christmas. From Christmas trees to your Christmas feast, there are many inherent dangers that go along with the holiday season. As far as puppy needs go, we’re educating our readers with thorough breed profiles and comprehensive lists that will help you prepare for everything from vaccinations to selecting the right puppy food.

Once your research has been concluded, and you’ve decked the halls with all the supplies you’ll need to care for your new puppy, you can begin thinking about one of the most exciting responsibilities of bringing home a new puppy; naming! And what better way to honor the holiday season than to give your new puppy the gift of a Christmas themed name?

Our Favorite Christmas Themed Cat Names

We’ve compiled a list of some of our favorite Christmas themed dog names. From traditional Christmas figures, to pop culture holiday trends, you’re sure to find the holiday-themed name that’s right for your new puppy. Enjoy!

  • Alpine
  • Angel
  • Antler
  • Aspen
  • Baby
  • Balthasar (one of the wise men)
  • Bell
  • Bert (From It’s a Wonderful Life)
  • Beth
  • Bethlehem
  • Blessing
  • Blitzen
  • Blizzard
  • Boots
  • Brandy
  • Candle
  • Candy
  • Carol
  • Caspar (One of the wise men)
  • Charity
  • Charlie Brown
  • Cheer
  • Cinnamon
  • Clarence (From It’s a Wonderful Life)
  • Claus
  • Coal
  • Comet
  • Cratchit
  • Crimson
  • Cupid
  • Dancer
  • David
  • Donner
  • Drummer (Boy)
  • Dwarf
  • Ebenezer
  • Elf
  • Emmanuel
  • Ernie (From It’s a Wonderful Life)
  • Fir
  • Forest
  • Frostine
  • Frosty
  • Fudge
  • Gabriel (Christmas Angel)
  • Garland
  • George (From It’s a Wonderful Life)
  • Gift
  • Glitter
  • Gloria
  • Gold
  • Goldie
  • Grinch
  • Harry (From It’s a Wonderful Life)
  • Holly
  • Hope
  • Icelynn
  • Icicle
  • Igloo
  • Ivory
  • Ivy
  • Jack Frost
  • Jingle
  • Joesph
  • Joy
  • King
  • Kringle
  • Kris
  • Love
  • Lucy
  • Malachi (God’s Messenger)
  • Mary (From It’s a Wonderful Life)
  • Melchior (one of the wise man)
  • Midnight
  • Mistle – for mistletoe
  • Mittens
  • Mr. Jingles
  • Myrrh
  • Naz
  • Nazareth
  • Nicholas
  • Noel
  • North
  • Nutcracker
  • Nutmeg
  • Nutty
  • Pecan
  • Prancer
  • Raron (for Little Drummer Boy)
  • Ribbon
  • Robin
  • Rosemary
  • Rudolph
  • Rudolf
  • Rudy
  • Santa
  • Scrooge
  • Shepherd
  • Sleigh
  • Snowball
  • Snowy
  • Solstice
  • Sparkle
  • Spirit
  • Star
  • Starlight
  • Stocking
  • Stormy
  • Sugar Plumb
  • Susan (from Miracle on 34th)
  • Tannen (after Tannenbaum)
  • Tinsel
  • Tiny Tim
  • Twinkle
  • Vixen
  • Vortex
  • Wenceslas (good king went out on the feast of Stephen)
  • Winter
  • Wish
  • Yule (English name meaning Born at Christmas)
  • Zuzu (From It’s a Wonderful Life)

Celebrate The Holidays with PetPlace

The holidays are just around the corner. Know that with PetPlace, you can be prepared for anything your new pup throws at you. We know that most people will likely need to meet their new puppy before deciding on a name, but by using the above-listed names to create a short-list, you can narrow down your choices ahead of time. Be prepared for all things Christmas and puppy related with PetPlace this year. Merry Christmas!

Best Christmas Themed Cat Names

Christmas is a time for coming together with good friends and family. And for most, that includes furry family members as well. Around the holidays, breeders and shelters alike see an increase in adoptions. Whether you’re bringing home your first kitten or your third, it can be tempting to get swept up in the holiday cheer and bring home a new friend. But we would say a word of caution. The holidays can be an excellent time to bring home a new kitten for those who are planning to stay around the house and relax, but it may not be the best time to adopt if you’re planning on going on vacation for either Christmas or New Years. While cats are a little more hands off than other pets, like a dog, for example, they’ll still need love and attention to help them become accustomed to their new home.

And don’t forget about kitty proofing. The holidays can be a dangerous time for pets, including young, curious kittens. Even older cats can become enamored with dangerous holiday staples like Christmas lights or tinsel on the tree. You’ll need to make sure that your home is kitten-proofed before bringing home a new furry friend, and doing so during the holidays can be tricky.

We aren’t trying to counsel you away from bringing home a new kitten or adult cat this holiday season; we just want to make sure that you’re prepared for the reality of bringing home a living being. If you’ve prepared, and have planned ahead, then bringing home a new kitty for Christmas can be a wonderful and rewarding experience.

One of the most exciting aspects of bringing home a new pet is deciding on a name! And what a better way to utilize the holiday season than by giving your Christmas kitty and holiday-themed name? From Angle to Zuzu, we’ve compiled some of our favorite Christmas-themed cat names to help you find the right name for your new furry family member this holiday season. Enjoy!

Traditional Christmas Figures

These traditional Christmas figures have helped to shape Christmas with their love and cheer. What better way to celebrate the holiday than by giving your new kitty a traditional Christmas name?

  • Angel
  • Balthasar (one of the wise men)
  • Bethlehem
  • Caspar (one of the wise men)
  • Claus
  • Emmanuel
  • Frank (incense) – Gift from the wiseman
  • Gabriel (Christmas Angel)
  • Gloria
  • Glory
  • Joseph
  • Joy
  • Magi
  • Malachi (God’s messenger)
  • Melchior (wiseman)
  • Myrrh
  • Naz
  • Nazareth
  • Noel
  • Shepherd
  • Spirit
  • Star
  • Starlight

Pop Culture Christmas Figures

From famous literary characters to flying reindeer, this list has it all! Read on to find the purrfect pop culture Christmas name for your cat!

  • Bert (from It’s a Wonderful Life)
  • Blitzen
  • Clarence (from It’s a Wonderful Life)
  • Comet
  • Cratchit
  • Cupid
  • Donner
  • Ebenezer
  • Ernie (from It’s a Wonderful Life)
  • George (from It’s a Wonderful Life)
  • Harry (from It’s a Wonderful Life)
  • Jack (for Mr.Frost)
  • Jack Frost
  • Kris
  • Mary (from It’s a Wonderful Life)
  • Raron (for the Little Drummer Boy)
  • Rudolf
  • Rudy
  • Scrooge
  • Susan (from Miracle of 34th)
  • Tiny Tim
  • Zuzu (from It’s a Wonderful Life)

Christmas-Inspired Names

From decorations to classic holiday figures, the names on this list can be both on the nose, or a bit more vague. Find a name that can evoke the Christmas spirit all year long with this list.

  • Bell
  • Bella
  • Beth
  • Blessing
  • C.D. (Christmas Dog)
  • Candle
  • Candy
  • Carol
  • Christian
  • Christmas Cookie
  • Coal (for bad cats only)
  • Crystal
  • Douglas Fir
  • Elden (meaning Elf)
  • Elf
  • Fir
  • Forest
  • Frosty
  • Fraser Fir
  • Fudge
  • Garland
  • Gift
  • Holly
  • Ice
  • Isabella
  • Ivy
  • Merry
  • Midnight (it came upon a midnight clear)
  • Mistletoe
  • Nicholas
  • Nick
  • North
  • Peace
  • Pecan
  • Poinsettia
  • Pumpkin
  • Sleigh
  • Snow
  • Snowball
  • Tinsel
  • Twinkle

Home for the Holidays With PetPlace

The holidays are fast approaching! If you’re planning on bringing home a new feline family member we hope that this list has helped you to narrow down your name choices. Of course, you’ll probably want to meet your new cat first. But now you have a list ready for when the day arrives! Do you want to know what the most common cat names mean? We have an entire blog dedicated to the “meaning” behind common male and female cat names. Happy holidays!

Cat in heat?

Surviving your cat’s mating season can be trying. Felines that have not been spayed go into heat several times a year. A queen, the term for a cat in her reproductive years, may go into heat every three weeks or so. She’s not very secretive about it. The behavior of a cat in heat is often irritating to humans. You’ll have to be patient while waiting out the week of her hormonal cycle. If you’re not into cat breeding, you’ll also have to keep your feline indoors to prevent her from getting pregnant.

The Feline Reproductive Cycle

We don’t learn a lot about the feline reproductive cycle in health class. Therefore, you may be caught off guard if you don’t spay your kitten before she enters her first heat cycle. According to Revival Animal Health, most cats go through puberty when they are five to nine months old. However, heat cycles correspond with seasonal signals. Cats normally go into heat when the weather is warmer and the days are longer. From September to January, a feline’s ovaries tend to be inactive. When early spring hits, cats start their heat cycles. An intact cat that stays indoors could go into heat throughout the year if she is exposed to long hours of artificial light.

Before your pet reaches the stage in which she can become pregnant, her ovaries start to become active. This is called the proestrus period and lasts from one to four days. This stage is followed by the estrus period, during which your cat can get pregnant. Unlike humans, cats don’t ovulate unless they engage in sexual activity. A cat that doesn’t ovulate will continue to cycle through reproductive periods every two or three weeks. If she does copulate with a male, she will ovulate and increase her chances of getting pregnant.

Signs That Your Cat Is In Heat

Before your cat goes into heat, she will rub her rear against just about anything: people, furniture, and walls are favorites. Even if your cat is a neat freak that licks herself frequently, you’ll start to notice that her grooming behavior changes when she is in heat. She’ll begin to clean her genital area excessively. Then, she’ll start to send out a mating call. The meowing is loud and incessant. It might even sound like your queen is in pain. She’s not. This is normal hormonal behavior.

Some cats mark their territory by spraying a strong-smelling urine on vertical surfaces. She’ll back up, raise her tail, and spray a jet of liquid onto your walls. You can’t stop her from doing this, but you can prevent it from causing odors with some easy steps. Wash the area right away with an enzymatic cleaner, which breaks down the urine. Spraying a deodorizing disinfectant on the area may prevent your feline from marking the same area again. If your cat has sprayed on soft material, clean it with a fabric-safe solution. If you can, dry it in the sun to eliminate residual odors.

Helping Your Cat Stay Calm

Queens can make aggressive-sounding noises if they spot a male cat out the window. While your cat is in heat, you may want to restrict her view of the outside world. Tomcats can smell a cat in heat from several blocks to a mile away. Don’t be surprised if your kitty has a line of willing suitors waiting outside. You’ll need to be extra vigilant about preventing her from sneaking out an open door or window if you’re not planning to breed her.

A cat will be extra clingy during her cycle. She might follow you around, rubbing on your legs and demanding a back rub. Pet her on her lower back, near her tail. She’ll respond by holding her tail to the side, exposing her genital area. She may also roll around on the floor or crawl with her chest on the floor and rear raised high. This is normal.

Play with your cat, and give her plenty of attention during this time. Using her favorite toy to get her to run around the house can exhaust her so that she doesn’t yowl throughout the night. Lots of petting and kitty massage can help her settle down. Brushing her can help her relax and stimulate the spot at the base of the tail that needs some attention.

Should You Spay Your Cat?

If you are planning to breed your cat, it helps to know the animal’s history. Did she come from a line of healthy animals? Are you familiar with the male cat’s background? It is important to understand whether the cats’ mothers had easy births. Sometimes, breeding is not a good idea. This is especially true if one of the animals’ mothers had a difficult time in pregnancy or labor.

When is the Best Time to Get Pet Insurance for Your Cat?

When is the Best Time to Get Pet Insurance for your cat?

Kitten or adult: when is the best time to buy pet insurance for your cat? Does it save money to do it later or is it best to start coverage as soon as possible?

In a vet’s opinion, the best time to get pet insurance for your cat is when you are able to afford it. Although it’s good to have coverage at any age, the premiums are actually less if you start insurance when your cat is a kitten then if you start when he or she is an adult. Bear in mind as well that some insurance companies will not insure cats over a certain age (typically 10 years old) although they will continue coverage if the cat was insured when they were younger.

Accidents and injuries can happen at any age and at any time. Young cats are more likely to be injured and older cats are more likely to suffer from chronic illness. If you are concerned about paying for care for your cat, pet insurance is a good idea as long as it works into your budget.

I hope this article has helped you find the best time to get pet insurance.

A Vet Tells All About What Cats Need Insurance

Have you ever wondered what vets really think about pet insurance? Is it a good idea? Do vets trust it? If you have, here are some honest opinions by veterinarians on the subject.

First, what cats need insurance? Although it’s not a bad idea for all cats to be covered, most young cats are pretty healthy and have minimal problems. Insurance policies are more likely to be advantageous as cats age and may have a better “return” in their senior years. Just like kids in their teens or 20s, most serious problems surface either very early on or as they get much older.

Similar to people, cats generally have more problems as they get older. As humans advance in age we tire out faster, injury more easily, and are more likely to have problems such as heart disease, high blood pressure, and obesity. Cats might not get the same problems but they do tend to develop health issues as they age.

However, bear in mind that some insurance companies will not cover cats above a certain age. And once a health problem has already developed, many insurance companies will consider it a pre-existing condition and exclude it from coverage when you do get insurance.

Another thing to consider is that some young pets can have chronic problems such as allergies that require many vet visits and can rack up large vet bills. These problems can develop quickly and often require specialist care which can be very pricey without insurance.

Summary

According to the vets interviewed for this article, pet insurance gives you the most benefit when your cat is a senior and prone to problems. However, most companies won’t insure older cats, so it is best to insure your cat when they are still young and eligible.

If you want the best for your cat and have budget limitations that could affect their level of care, the best time for pet insurance is RIGHT NOW. When you cannot afford an unexpected big expense and don’t want to compromise your cat’s care, pet insurance is good for you.

I hope this article gives you more information about the best time to buy pet insurance for your cat.

Is Pet Insurance Right for you?

The best pet insurance offers coverage that’s broad enough for whatever care your pet needs and with enough options to get the perfect coverage for you and your pet.

As one of the first pet insurance providers in the U.S., PetPartners has been offering affordable, comprehensive pet health insurance to dogs and cats in all 50 states since 2002. Trusted as the exclusive pet insurance provider for the American Kennel Club and the Cat Fanciers’ Association, PetPartners highly customizable options allow pet owners to create a plan that fits their individual needs and budget — so you’re not paying for added coverage you don’t necessarily need or want. Visit www.PetPartners.com today to see if pet insurance is right for you and your family.”)


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13 Reasons to Have Pet Insurance for Your Cat

Pet insurance is growing in popularity as owners learn about the benefits of what having coverage for their pet can mean. Pet insurance can help pet owners pay for costly pet care when their pet becomes ill, is injured or even for wellness visits such as vaccinations.

13 reasons to have pet insurance? Here is the list:

1. You want the best for your cat.
2. You might not be able to afford a large, unexpected, expense.
3. Early diagnosis is critical. You want to be able to take your pet to the vet at the first sign of a problem, not wait until things get really bad because you’re worried about the cost.

4. You can see any licensed vet and know you’ll be reimbursed.
5. Trips to an emergency clinic or a specialist can be expensive. Pet Insurance covers both.
6. Many pet insurance companies offer discounts if your pet is spayed or neutered, if you have multiple pets on the policy, or if you pay annually.
7. Wellness care options help you pay for routine care items like flea control, heartworm prevention, and vaccines.

8. Need to have your pet spayed or neutered? Microchipped? A dental cleaning? Wellness care options can help pay for those too.
9. Chronic conditions, like allergies and diabetes, can be covered for the life of your pet.
10. Prefer eastern medicine or alternative therapies? Many pet insurance companies cover them!
11. You don’t want to have to dip into savings or rack up credit card debt to pay for your pet’s veterinary care.

12. Once your pet is covered, they’re covered for life. You don’t have to worry about them being dropped as they get older or if they have a lot of claims.
13. Pet insurance is flexible. Most companies allow you to select the coverage that fits both your budget and your needs.

As a veterinarian – I really like how pet insurance helps cat owners do the best for their cats without worrying about medical care costs. Most veterinarians have euthanized hundreds, if not thousands, of pets because their owners could not afford the care. This is the #1 reason I personally recommend pet insurance. It helps me give the best medical care for my patients.

Is Pet Insurance Right for you?

The best pet insurance offers coverage that’s broad enough for whatever care your pet needs and with enough options to get the perfect coverage for you and your pet.

As one of the first pet insurance providers in the U.S., PetPartners has been offering affordable, comprehensive pet health insurance to dogs and cats in all 50 states since 2002. Trusted as the exclusive pet insurance provider for the American Kennel Club and the Cat Fanciers’ Association, PetPartners highly customizable options allow pet owners to create a plan that fits their individual needs and budget — so you’re not paying for added coverage you don’t necessarily need or want. Visit www.PetPartners.com today to see if pet insurance is right for you and your family.”)


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Should I Get Pet Insurance for My Cat?

Should I Get Pet Insurance for My Cat?

As a veterinarian I hear this question nearly every other day: “Should I get pet insurance for my cat?” Cat lovers often have many questions on the subject including “Does pet insurance pay for itself?” and “How late is too late to get pet insurance for my cat?”

These are excellent questions with no easy answers. I typically tell clients that if you can afford an unexpected $3,000 to $5,000 vet bill then you may not need pet insurance for your cat. However, if a bill this size would be really difficult for you to pay and you still want the best possible care for your cat, having pet insurance can really help.

Insurance is a form of risk management. It helps minimize your risk of financial loss if something happens. You buy home insurance in case disaster occurs such as a house fire. Having insurance minimizes the risk of totally losing the value of your home. Pet insurance limits how liable you are for the cost of veterinary care for your cat.

The goal or purpose of pet insurance is to protect you against big medical bills if your cat is ill or injured. This allows you to do the best for your pet if a problem occurs. Some pet owners are forced to euthanize their cats when they can’t afford unexpected expenses, and pet insurance aims to prevent that from happening.

Despite the benefits, some people prefer not to deal with insurance companies or would rather handle veterinary costs on their own. One alternative to pet insurance is to start a savings account or open a credit card just for emergency vet care. This can work okay if you have a good amount in the account when and if something happens.

In short, if finances are at all a factor in deciding your cat’s care, insurance could be a very good idea. It can help you afford better care at a lower price for the animals you love.

I hope this answers your questions on whether you should get pet insurance for your cat.

 

Is Pet Insurance Right For You?

The best pet insurance offers coverage that’s broad enough for whatever care your pet needs and with enough options to get the perfect coverage for you and your pet.

As one of the first pet insurance providers in the U.S., PetPartners has been offering affordable, comprehensive pet health insurance to dogs and cats in all 50 states since 2002. Trusted as the exclusive pet insurance provider for the American Kennel Club and the Cat Fanciers’ Association, PetPartners highly customizable options allow pet owners to create a plan that fits their individual needs and budget — so you’re not paying for added coverage you don’t necessarily need or want. Visit www.PetPartners.com today to see if pet insurance is right for you and your family.”)

A Vet’s Opinion: What are the Pros and Cons of Pet Insurance?

What are the Pros and Cons of Pet Insurance?

You might wonder about the advantages and disadvantages of getting pet insurance for your dog or cat. How do you know if you need it? Do most vets even recommend it?

As a veterinarian I see pet owners struggle over whether to buy pet insurance. They aren’t sure whether it’s necessary or worth the cost.

These are all good questions and ones that I’m glad pet owners are considering. The difficult decisions that result in euthanasia for economic reasons often happen to owners who didn’t consider what they would do if something major happened to their pet.

Insurance is designed to protect you and your pet against an unexpected expensive event such as an accident or illness. But like anything, it has its pros and cons. Here are the big pluses and minuses of pet insurance:

Pros

  • Pet insurance can protect you against a large unexpected expense or an expensive ongoing expense. For example, I recently saw Fuzzy, a 6-year-old Schnauzer who was drinking and urinating more and having accidents in the house. After testing, the diagnosis was diabetes. Fuzzy was very sick initially and since has gotten better, but not without a lot of medical care and time. The expenses over the past 2 ½ months have totaled about $2000, and he is going to have diabetes the rest of his life. Hopefully he won’t have ongoing problems and will be what we refer to as an “easy diabetic”; that is, his condition is easy to regulate and responds well to treatment. However, his owners will have years of bills. Would this situation make your life difficult to deal with these expenses? If so, then pet insurance is right for you.
  • Certain pet insurance plans also can help you provide routine care for your pet. If you have a policy that includes wellness or general care, you can ensure your pet gets all the recommended precautions to keep her healthy. Routine care includes annual examinations, vaccinations, dental cleaning, heartworm testing and prevention, and flea control medications. If you utilize this benefit, it can encourage you to provide the best care for your pet.

Cons

  • Pet insurance policies can be confusing. When choosing a policy, make sure the features that are most important to you are part of the plan. For example, some policies exclude coverage for hereditary conditions such as hip dysplasia which can affect several breeds but may not show up until later in life.
  • Your policy may never pay for itself. Remember, it’s a safety net, not an investment. You can’t expect to get your money back, and you could spend more in premiums in your pet’s life than you ever would if you just went to the vet. That said, you don’t know what’s going to happen in your pet’s lifetime and it’s often best to be prepared. I think of it like having homeowners insurance. Some homeowners spend hundreds of dollars every year and never file a claim so, strictly speaking, in the end they did not get their money’s worth. But you never know what could happen. For example, if you had a house fire or other distressing event without insurance, it would be devastating. You can’t put a price tag on peace of mind so that alone may be worth the premium for you.
  • Certain pet insurance plans also can help you provide routine care for your pet. But if you don’t utilize these benefits while paying for them, it’s easy for pet owners to overpay for this benefit.

I hope this gives you more information on the pros and cons of pet insurance.

Is Pet Insurance Right For You?

The best pet insurance offers coverage that’s broad enough for whatever care your pet needs and with enough options to get the perfect coverage for you and your pet.

As one of the first pet insurance providers in the U.S., PetPartners has been offering affordable, comprehensive pet health insurance to dogs and cats in all 50 states since 2002. Trusted as the exclusive pet insurance provider for the American Kennel Club and the Cat Fanciers’ Association, PetPartners highly customizable options allow pet owners to create a plan that fits their individual needs and budget — so you’re not paying for added coverage you don’t necessarily need or want. Visit www.PetPartners.com today to see if pet insurance is right for you and your family.”)

Is My Cat Too Old for Pet Insurance?

Is my Cat Too Old for Pet Insurance? Can I Insure My Senior Cat?

Senior cats are very special companions. Unfortunately, as cats age, they have more health problems and require more care that can be expensive. Many owners of senior cats are interested in pet insurance but can be difficult to provide them with pet insurance coverage. Below is information to help you understand whether your senior cat can be insured, or whether they are too old for pet insurance.

Every pet insurance company is different. Some have no upper age limits for benefits and will keep covering your cat no matter how old they are, as long as you maintain your policy and pay your premiums. For example, if you insure your cat when he is a kitten, he can be covered for the rest of his life as long as you pay the premium. Commonly, pet insurance companies refuse to offer new policies to dogs outside their age limit.

Eligibility of Senior Cats for Pet Insurance

Based on our research at the time of publication, the following pet insurance companies offered the following eligibility for senior cats:

  • Petplan offers insurance to dogs, cats, puppies, and kittens with no upper age limit.
  • Pet Partners offers pet insurance to the following:
    • Dogs and cats 14 years & younger are eligible for full accident and illness coverage
    • If your pet falls outside of these guidelines, Embrace considers them eligible for an accident-only plan.
  • Trupanion offers pet insurance to dogs and cats between 8 weeks and 14 years of age.
  • VPI offers new coverage to pets 10 years of age or younger.
  • Pethealth has no upper age limits for dogs and cats.
  • PetsPlusUs insures pets 7 weeks and older.
  • ASPCA has no upper age limit.
  • Pets Best insures dogs and cats 7 weeks and older with no upper age limit.
  • PetsFirst has no age limits.
  • Healthy Paws insures all dog and cat breeds from 8 weeks to 14 years of age.
  • Protect Your Bubble insures dogs from 8 weeks of age to 12 years old and cats from 8 weeks to 14 years.
  • PetSecure insures all ages and all breeds of cats and dogs.

I hope this gives you more information about whether your cat is too old for pet insurance.

Is Pet Insurance Right For You?

The best pet insurance offers coverage that’s broad enough for whatever care your pet needs and with enough options to get the perfect coverage for you and your pet.

As one of the first pet insurance providers in the U.S., PetPartners has been offering affordable, comprehensive pet health insurance to dogs and cats in all 50 states since 2002. Trusted as the exclusive pet insurance provider for the American Kennel Club and the Cat Fanciers’ Association, PetPartners highly customizable options allow pet owners to create a plan that fits their individual needs and budget — so you’re not paying for added coverage you don’t necessarily need or want. Visit www.PetPartners.com today to see if pet insurance is right for you and your family.”)


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Great Tips to Help You Give Your Cat Medications

How do you make your cat take a pill or liquid medication? How how about applying topical medications?

I’ve found that a lot of people hate it just as much as their cats do! Unfortunately most cats need some kind of medication at least once in their lives so today I want to share some resources which can make the process much easier.

Giving medication to a cat can be a real challenge. Here are some tips from our veterinarians and veterinary technicians on how to give your cat pill, topical, liquid, ear, and eye medications.

How to Administer Pill Medication to Your Cat – This article has some very good tips on how to get your cat to swallow pills.

How to Apply Topical Medication to Your Cat – Learn how to apply topical medication with the least amount of stress to your cat.

How to Administer Ear Medication to Your Cat– Many pets are especially fussy when it comes to medications for ear mites and ear infections so these tips are very useful.

How to Administer Eye Medication to Your Cat– These medications can be a real challenge but a few shortcuts can make giving them easier.

How to Administer Liquid Medication to Your Cat. Many antibiotics come in liquid form which work great for small cats. Here are some tips.

How to Give Injectable Medication to Your Cat – This isn’t common but occasionally veterinarians will prescribe injectable medications that you give at home. Learn more here.

For pets that are really impossible to pill – you can get Flavored Medications for Cats.

These instructions are worth printing and keeping in a first aid or health file for your pet. You never know when you will need it.

One more thing. You should only give your cat medications that your veterinarian has approved. Giving “human” medicines to your cat can be very dangerous.

I hope these tips help you give your cat different types of medications weather in liquid, pill, or topical forms.

21 Symptoms You Should Never Ignore in Your Dog

There are serious symptoms that should never be ignored in your dog. A symptom is defined as “any problem that can indicate an underlying disease” and may be your first clue to the presence of a life-threatening problem in your dog. Here is a list of 21 symptoms that should never be ignored if you see them from your dog!

1. Pacing and Restlessness. In dogs, pacing and restlessness can be indicate pain, discomfort or distress. These symptoms can be associated with a condition called bloat in which the stomach twists. Bloat is life-threatening and most commonly occurs in large breed or deep-chested dogs.

2. Unproductive Retching. Dogs that attempt to vomit and are unable to bring anything up is another common symptom of “bloat”. You should call your veterinarian immediately. Click here to learn more about “bloat”.

3. Collapse or Fainting. Acute collapse is a sudden loss of strength causing your dog to fall and be unable to rise. Some dogs that suddenly collapse will actually lose consciousness. This is called fainting or syncope. Some dogs recover very quickly and look essentially normal just seconds to minutes after collapsing, whereas others stay in the collapsed state until helped. All the reasons for collapse or fainting are serious and should not be ignored. See your veterinarian immediately. Click here to learn more.

4. Not Eating or Loss of Appetite. Anorexia is a term used to describe the situation where an animal loses his appetite, does not want to eat or is unable to eat. There are many causes of a “loss of appetite” and is often the first indication of illness. Regardless of the cause, loss of appetite can have a serious impact on an animal’s health if it lasts 24 hours or more. Young animals less than 6 months of age are particularly prone to the problems brought on by loss of appetite. Click here to learn more.

5. Losing Weight. Weight loss is a physical condition that results from a negative caloric balance. This usually occurs when the body uses and/or excretes essential nutrients faster than it can consume them. Essentially more calories are being burned than are being taken in. Weight loss is considered clinically important when it exceeds 10 percent of the normal body weight and is not associated with fluid loss. There are several causes for this, some of which can be very serious. Click here to learn more.

6. Breathing Problems. Respiratory distress, often called dyspnea, is labored, difficult breathing or shortness of breath. This can occur at any time during the breathing process, during inspiration (breathing in) or expiration (breathing out). When your dog has trouble breathing, he may not be able to get enough oxygen to his tissues. Additionally, if he has heart failure, he may not be able to pump sufficient blood to his muscles and other tissues. Dyspnea is often associated with accumulation of fluid (edema) in the lungs or the chest cavity (pleural effusion). This fluid can lead to shortness of breath and coughing. This is a very serious symptom and should be evaluated immediately. Click here to learn more.

7. Red Eye. A “red eye” is a non-specific sign of inflammation or infection. It may be seen with several different diseases including those involving different parts of the eye including the external eyelids, third eyelid, conjunctiva, cornea, and sclera. It may also occur with inflammation of the structures inside the eye, with glaucoma (high pressure within the eye) or with certain diseases of the orbit (eye socket). Either one or both eyes can become red, depending upon the cause of the problem. Some of the possible causes can be serious and ultimately cause blindness. Click here to learn more.

8. Jaundice. Jaundice, also referred to as icterus, describes the yellow color taken on by the tissues throughout the body due to elevated levels of bilirubin, a substance that comes from the breakdown of red blood cells. There are several causes for jaundice and regardless of the cause, jaundice is considered abnormal and serious in the dog. Click here to learn more.

9. Trouble Urinating. “Trouble urinating” can include straining to urinate, frequent attempts at urination, and evidence of discomfort when urinating. Discomfort may be demonstrated by crying out during urination, excessive licking at the urogenital region or turning and looking at the area. There are several underlying causes. Some of the causes if left untreated can result in death in as little as 36 hours. Click here to learn more.