Try These Medium Size Hypoallergenic Dogs

Hypoallergenic dogs are a good choice for people with pet allergies. They shed very little, which means there is less dander in the house to stir up allergies. These medium-size hypoallergenic dogs make great additions to any family. They’re not too big and not too small, and they’re easy on your allergies. So if you’re looking for medium dogs that don’t shed, take a look at these wonderful canines.

Irish Terrier

The Irish Terrier stands about 18 to 20 inches at the shoulder and weighs about 25 to 27 pounds. It has a life expectancy of about 12 to 16 years. This is an active, energetic, spunky dog. This breed of terrier is easy to train and makes a good watchdog. They may become excessive barkers if not trained from an early age. The goal of this fearless dog is to protect their loved ones. This is a great family dog that is wonderful with children, however, they do not do well with other dogs. They will not back down from a challenge and are known to take on much larger dogs. The Irish Terrier can get along with cats if raised with them from puppyhood, but because of their strong hunting drive, they are not good with small animals like hamsters. This is an intelligent dog, but the Irish Terrier tends to be independent and a bit stubborn. This athletic breed requires daily exercise and a job to keep them occupied so they do not bark or become destructive. The Irish Terrier has a tight, wiry coat that requires regular grooming. To learn more about the Irish Terrier, go to Choosing an Irish Terrier.

Kerry Blue Terrier

The Kerry Blue Terrier stands between 17 and 19 inches high at the shoulder and weighs between 33 and 40 pounds. This working breed comes from Ireland and has a life expectancy of about 12 to 15 years. This terrier breed has soft, thick, wavy hair with little to no shedding, however, it does require daily brushing to avoid mats. The unique coloring of this breed is a blue-gray, although puppies start out black transitioning to their blue-gray coat at about 18 months of age. The Kerry Blue Terrier is a very good watchdog. They are smart and do very well with training. However, this breed can be strong-willed, so it will take a firm hand at training. Because of this, the breed may not be the best choice for the first-time dog owner. This is a good family dog that bonds with all members of the family, and they are great with children. Energetic and playful, the Kerry Blue Terrier needs plenty of daily exercise and mental stimulation. They do best when they have a job to occupy them, so they won’t resort to barking or destructive behavior. Like all terriers, he loves to dig and chase and has a high prey drive. This breed has a tendency to chase smaller animals. They are not especially good with other dogs. They can become aggressive with other dogs and are not known to back down from a fight. To learn more about the Kerry Blue Terrier, go to Choosing a Kerry Blue Terrier.

Lakeland Terrier

The Lakeland Terrier stands about 13 to 14 inches high at the shoulder and weighs about 15 to 17 pounds. It has an average life expectancy of about 12 to 15 years. The Lakeland Terrier is friendly and affectionate, making it a great companion. They are very intelligent but a bit stubborn when it comes to training. This breed gets along well with people, children, and other dogs but is reserved around strangers. The Lakeland Terrier can be stubborn, independent and difficult to housetrain. Like any terrier, the Lakie is prone to chasing small animals. They should be socialized to cats and other small animals from a young age. This can be an excitable dog with lots of energy. This breed is active and requires a lot of daily exercise to prevent them from becoming bored and destructive. They can also be very possessive about their food and toys. The Lakie excels as a watchdog, but excessive barking can be a problem. Originally bred to hunt foxes and to protect livestock in England, the Lakeland Terrier is energetic and agile with a high prey drive. This breed needs to be brushed several times a week and periodically stripped.

Puli

The Puli stands about 16 to 18 inches tall at the shoulder and weighs between 23 and 38 pounds. This breed has a life expectancy of about 10 to 15 years. The Puli has a unique corded coat that looks like a giant mop. But the Puli is not born with his dreadlocks. Rather, the adult coat grows in at about one year of age. The fluffy coat must be separated by hand into cords. His corded coat makes the Puli look much bigger than he actually is. The coat comes in solid colors including black, gray, white and rusty black. The Puli is originally from the country of Hungary, though its exact ancestry is not known. This affectionate companion dog is very loyal to its family but wary of strangers. With an instinct to protect and herd, they act as guardians of children and other family pets. They are also very sensitive to the needs of the sick and elderly, making them great therapy dogs. This playful dog enjoys the company of children and gets along with other dogs and family pets. Self-confident and highly intelligent, this dog can also be a bit stubborn. This breed requires lots of exercise and mental stimulation to avoid anxiety and destructive behaviors. They are very vocal and tend to bark. This breed enjoys playing well into their adult years. For more information about the Puli, go to Choosing a Puli.

Standard Schnauzer

The Standard Schnauzer stands about 17 to 20 inches high at the shoulder and weighs between 30 and 45 pounds. This breed has an average life expectancy of about 13 to 16 years. Native to Germany, the Schnauzer is a good hunter and herder. He makes a wonderful companion dog that will follow you wherever you go. This is an extremely intelligent and active dog that is especially good with children. These dogs insist on being part of the family activities. They are outstanding companions known for their loyalty and love of family. The Schnauzer is not a one-person – it is a true family member. This breed learns quickly and is eager to please, making them very good therapy dogs; but they are known to be stubborn making them a little difficult to housetrain. This affectionate and energetic breed needs daily exercise to prevent boredom and destructive behaviors. He is a high energy dog. They love to please their owners and they love to be the center of attention. The outer coat is tight and wiry with a soft undercoat. The wiry coat can be either pure black or salt-and-pepper gray (a mix of black and white) in color, and requires daily brushing. The Standard Schnauzer makes a good watch dog and will alert you to the presence of strangers. They will share their homes with other dogs and cats if they have been socialized to do so at a young age, but they are not to be trusted with small pets such as hamsters. They may be aggressive toward unknown dogs.

Tibetan Terrier

The Tibetan Terrier stands about 14 to 16 inches high at the shoulder and weighs about 20 to 28 pounds. Its average life expectancy is about 12 to 15 years. Although this breed is called a “terrier”, it actually is not related to a terrier. The breed originated in Tibet where it was regarded as a good luck charm. This dog can easily adapt to many different types of household. The Tibetan Terrier is affectionate and loves being with people. They are best suited to homes with school-age children who understand how to properly handle a dog. They do best in homes where they will receive a lot of attention and will not be left alone for long periods of time. Lively and fun-loving, this dog has a very sweet nature. This breed makes a very good therapy dog. The Tibetan Terrier does well with other dogs and pets, especially when they have been raised together. With a lot of energy to burn, these dogs require daily exercise to keep them from becoming bored and resorting to barking or destructive behaviors. This smart breed is easily trained. The Tibetan Terrier’s thick shaggy coat needs to be brushed every day. The Tibetan Terrier is known to bark and makes a good watchdog.

Looking for a Hypoallergenic Dog? Here’s What You Need to Know

While dogs are known to be man’s best friend, people who suffer from dog allergies might not have the same sentiment. Between 15 – 30 percent of Americans are allergic to pets. A majority of those people are allergic to cats instead of dogs, but there is still a sizeable amount of people who react negatively when they’re around dogs.

If you get a dog only to find out that you are allergic, what can you do? Many people in this position consider rehoming. To learn more about rehoming, go to What Is Rehoming for Pets.

For many people with pet allergies, the recourse for staying healthy is to avoid pets. This typically prevents people with dog allergies from owning a dog. The good news is – there are hypoallergenic dogs. Particular breeds are hypoallergenic dogs, which means that people with dog allergies will experience greatly decreased symptoms around dogs of those breeds. In some cases, people with dog allergies will not experience any symptoms at all.

Hypoallergenic dogs are the best choice for allergy sufferers who want to own a dog. That’s because they do not shed, or they shed very little, producing less dander. This makes them less likely to cause serious allergic reactions in those with dog allergies. If you own a hypoallergenic dog, it is recommended that you bathe the dog regularly to remove dander. This will help to reduce allergic reactions.

While hypoallergenic dogs are easier on people with allergies, the bottom line is, there is no dog that is 100 percent hypoallergenic. The saliva and skin of the dog can still trigger an allergic reaction in sensitive people. Before choosing a pet, you should discuss your options with your doctor. Also, before adopting hypoallergenic dogs, you should first visit with them before you adopt to test for allergic reactions.

Hypoallergenic dogs come in all sizes, giving you plenty of choices. Hypoallergenic dogs also come in long-haired and short-haired varieties. Many people make the mistake that longer-haired dogs will be worse for their allergies than short-haired dogs, but the fact is that there are hypoallergenic long-haired dogs.

You should be careful when adopting a hypoallergenic dog from a shelter. That’s because many shelter dogs are mixed breeds, so it is impossible to tell if the dog is really hypoallergenic. If you’re looking for hypoallergenic dogs, your best bet is to work with a breeder.

These Pooches Are Large Breeds That Don’t Shed

Looking for large breeds that don’t shed? Then you should take a look at these large hypoallergenic dogs.

Airedale Terrier
  • The Airedale Terrier excels in protection, agility, and obedience. It is an active and athletic dog that needs regular exercise. The Airedale is loyal and protective of its family, but the Airedale is willing to accept outsiders once its family has welcomed them inside. This breed is also good with children. This intelligent dog is highly trainable and should be socialized from a young age. This breed stands about 23 inches tall and weighs about 45 pounds. For more information about the Airedale Terrier, go to Choosing an Airedale.
Bouvier Des Flandres
  • This breed is a working dog. It is also a very good guard and police dog. The Bouvier Des Flandres is protective of the children in his family. They learn commands easily but some Bouviers can be strong willed with less assertive owners. The breed can also be aggressive towards strangers. The Bouvier needs regular exercise. Its long, shaggy coat requires regular brushing and trimming. This is a large dog measuring 24 to 28 inches at the shoulder and weighing about 90 pounds.
Giant Schnauzer
  • The Giant Schnauzer averages about 23 to 27 inches high and weighs between 65 to 100 pounds. This breed has a life expectancy of between 12 and 15 years. This handsome bearded dog has a wiry and dense double coat that requires regular brushing and occasional grooming. This fiercely loyal breed is very protective of their human companions and makes an excellent guard dog or watchdog. This is an active dog that needs daily exercise.
Irish Water Spaniel
  • Standing between 21 and 24 inches at the shoulder and weighing between 45 and 65 pounds, this large dog is an intelligent breed that loves the water. Its tight curly coat should be brushed and groomed regularly to prevent matting. This loving dog bonds closely with its family and is anxious to please, but they are naturally reserved towards strangers. The Irish Water Spaniel requires plenty of social interaction to keep them entertained. To learn more about this breed, go to Choosing an Irish Water Spaniel.
Komondor
  • The Komondor stands about 25 to 31 inches tall and weighs about 70 to 80 pounds. This breed looks like a big dust mop with a long, soft white coat that is corded into dreadlocks. This breed is at its best when it is working. If they are left without a job to do they become bored quickly. A great guardian, the Komondor is loyal, devoted and protective. He tends to protect his family, his home and his possessions. He is easily trained but because of his protective nature, he may not be gentle enough for every family.
Saluki
  • The Saluki stands about 23 to 28 inches high and weighs up to 65 pounds. Its coat is smooth, soft and silky. The Saluki requires occasional brushing, maybe once a week. Salukis are friendly, loving and gentle. They do not tolerate roughhousing and do better with older, gentle children. This breed is devoted to its family members and often has one special person. Salukis become so attached to their family members that they can become depressed if left alone for long periods of time. To learn more about this breed, go to Choosing a Saluki
Standard Poodle
  • The Standard Poodle stands about 15 inches high at the shoulders and weighs between 45 and 70 pounds. This breed has a lifespan of about 12 to 15 years. They have thick, curly, short hair. Poodles should be brushed on a daily basis and they need regular grooming. This is a very intelligent breed that learns quickly. They are very friendly dogs and make great companions. Poodles get along well with children and they enjoy being around other people and animals. They are very obedient. To learn more about the Standard Poodle, go to Choosing a Standard Poodle.
Wirehaired Pointing Griffon
  • Also known as a Griff, the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon stands about 20 to 24 inches high and weighs 50 to 60 pounds. This active dog is a strong swimmer and an excellent water retriever. It has a rough double coat that needs to be brushed twice a week. Friendly and easy to train, this intelligent and obedient dog is deeply devoted to his family. This breed makes a great family pet. Extremely sociable, the Griff gets along well with children and other dogs, but does not do well with cats and other small pets.
Mixed Breeds
  • If a breed is hypoallergenic, you may wonder if mixed breeds of these dogs also have that same trait. The answer is, maybe. It depends on which traits the hybrid dog has inherited from which parent. In fact, different puppies in the same litter may or may not be hypoallergenic, depending on which type of coat they have inherited.

To learn more about large breeds that don’t shed, go to These Pooches Are Large Breeds That Don’t Shed.

Got Allergies? Here Are Small Hypoallergenic Dog Breeds

Small hypoallergenic dog breeds make great companions. If you’re looking for small breeds that don’t shed, then take a look at these small hypoallergenic dog breeds.

Bichon Frise
  • This small hypoallergenic breed is a truly non-shedding small dog, making it an ideal pet for people with allergies. It has a sweet disposition and is a very popular house dog. The Bichon Frise looks like a little white powder puff. This is a playful, happy dog that is extremely affectionate and loving. They are intelligent dogs that learn quickly. To learn more about the Bichon Frise, go to Choosing a Bichon Frise.
Cairn Terrier
  • The Cairn Terrier stands 10 inches high and weighs about 13 to 14 pounds. The most famous Cairn Terrier is Toto from The Wizard of Oz. This is a very active breed with lots of energy to burn. They are very intelligent dogs that have a loving, playful nature. They make great companions for both adults and children. This breed is easy to train and they love to learn new tricks. Cairn Terriers are known to have a stubborn streak. To learn more about the Cairn Terrier, go to Choosing a Cairn Terrier.
Coton De Tulear
  • The Coton De Tulear originated in Madagascar. It is about 8 to 12 inches high and weighs between 8 to 13 pounds. This dog has a life expectancy of about 14 years. As a small dog that doesn’t shed, it is a good choice for allergy sufferers. The Coton De Tulear has a gentle nature – it is sweet and cuddly. A real people pleaser, this dog enjoys spending time with his family and his favorite activity is to cuddle up on the couch with you. Cotons are good with older children and children who know how to be gentle. This is a smart dog that quickly learns what is expected of him.
Havanese
  • The Havanese stands about 8 to 12 inches high and weighs about 7 to 14 pounds. Its life expectancy is about 12 to 15 years. This small dog originated in Cuba and it is hypoallergenic. This is a loving lap dog that loves being with his family. The Havanese does not like being alone and is known to bark and howl when you are gone. This breed gets along with people of all ages and all animals. This breed is smart, eager to please and very trainable.
Maltese
  • The Maltese stands about 8 to 10 inches high and weighs between 4 to 7 pounds, making it one of the smallest of the toy breeds. The life expectancy of the Maltese is about 12 to 15 years. This is an elegant and energetic small dog. This breed can become very attached to its owners. This dog has a protective nature, making it suspicious of strangers. This breed is highly intelligent and easily trained. The Maltese have a long, soft, white coat and low shedding. To learn more about the Maltese breed, go to Choosing a Maltese.
Miniature Schnauzer
  • The Miniature Schnauzer stands about 12 to 14 inches high and weighs about 10 to 15 pounds. With a long beard and bushy eyebrows, he is a very popular breed that truly enjoys the company of people. He wants to be next to you all the time. This active and intelligent breed loves to be the center of attention. They are affectionate and make wonderful companions. He is protective of his family and wary of strangers. This intelligent breed is a quick learner, but he can be very stubborn.
Shih Tzu
  • The Shih Tzu (which means “little lion”) stands about 9 to 11 inches high and weighs about 9 to 16 pounds. It has a life expectancy of about 10 to 16 years. This breed was developed in China and has a very recognizable appearance. This loveable dog is playful and loves to be the center of attention. These good natured dogs will follow you around the house and make very good companions. They are good with people of all ages, children and other pets. To learn more about this breed, go to Choosing a Shih Tzu.
Toy Poodle
  • The Poodle is one of the most popular house pet breeds. The Toy Poodle stands up to 10 inches tall and weighs about 6 to 9 pounds. Poodles rank as one of the most intelligent dog breeds. They are eager to please their owners and very easily trained. The Toy Poodle is outgoing and friendly with plenty of energy. They enjoy being around people of all ages, including children. This is a hypoallergenic dog with little to no shedding. Still, you’ll need to brush this dog every day and visit the groomer every 4 to 6 weeks to maintain that fluffy coat. To learn more about the Toy Poodle, go to Choosing a Toy Poodle.
Yorkshire Terrier
  • The Yorkshire Terrier or “Yorkie” as it is also known is one of the most popular dog breeds in the United States. The Yorkie stands about 7 to 9 inches high and weighs about 4 to 7 pounds. This breed has a life expectancy of about 12 to 15 years. This breed is smart and self-confident. The spunky Yorkie is often the center of attention. These small dogs are big on personality and they make loving companions. This lovable lap dog has lots of energy and loves to play. The Yorkie’s silky coat should be brushed daily. Many owners will clip their Yorkshire Terriers to reduce the amount of grooming needed. This breed can be difficult to housebreak. To learn more about this breed, go to Choosing a Yorkshire Terrier.

Try These Medium Size Hypoallergenic Dogs

Hypoallergenic dogs are a good choice for people with pet allergies. They shed very little, which means there is less dander in the house to stir up allergies. These medium-size hypoallergenic dogs make great additions to any family. They’re not too big and not too small, and they’re easy on your allergies. So if you’re looking for medium dogs that don’t shed, take a look at these wonderful canines.

Irish Terrier
  • The Irish Terrier stands about 18 to 20 inches at the shoulder and weighs about 25 to 27 pounds. It has a life expectancy of about 12 to 16 years. This is an active, energetic, spunky dog. This breed of terrier is easy to train and makes a good watchdog. They may become excessive barkers if not trained from an early age. This is a great family dog that is wonderful with children, however, they do not do well with other dogs. The Irish Terrier can get along with cats if raised with them from puppyhood, but because of their strong hunting drive, they are not good with small animals like hamsters. To learn more about the Irish Terrier, go to Choosing an Irish Terrier.
Kerry Blue Terrier
  • The Kerry Blue Terrier stands between 17 and 19 inches high at the shoulder and weighs between 33 and 40 pounds. This working breed comes from Ireland and has a life expectancy of about 12 to 15 years. This terrier breed has soft, thick, wavy hair with little to no shedding, however, it does require daily brushing to avoid mats. The unique coloring of this breed is a blue-gray. The breed may not be the best choice for first-time dog owner. This is a good family dog that bonds with all members of the family, and they are great with children. They can become aggressive with other dogs and are not known to back down from a fight. To learn more about the Kerry Blue Terrier, go to Choosing a Kerry Blue Terrier.
Lakeland Terrier
  • The Lakeland Terrier stands about 13 to 14 inches high at the shoulder and weighs about 15 to 17 pounds. It has an average life expectancy of about 12 to 15 years. The Lakeland Terrier is friendly and affectionate, making it a great companion. They are very intelligent but a bit stubborn. This breed gets along well with people, children, and other dogs but is reserved around strangers. They are active and require a lot of daily exercise to prevent them from becoming bored and destructive. They can also be very possessive about their food and toys. The Lakie excels as a watchdog, but excessive barking can be a problem.
Puli
  • The Puli stands about 16 to 18 inches tall at the shoulder and weighs between 23 and 38 pounds. This breed has a life expectancy of about 10 to 15 years. The Puli has a unique corded coat that looks like a giant mop. His corded coat makes the Puli look much bigger than he actually is. This affectionate companion dog is very loyal to its family but wary of strangers. With an instinct to protect and herd, they act as guardians of children and other family pets. They are also very sensitive to the needs of the sick and elderly, making them great therapy dogs. This playful dog enjoys the company of children and gets along with other dogs and family pets. To learn more about the Puli, go to Choosing a Puli.
Standard Schnauzer
  • The Standard Schnauzer stands about 17 to 20 inches high at the shoulder and weighs between 30 and 45 pounds. This breed has an average life expectancy of about 13 to 16 years. Native to Germany, the Schnauzer is a good hunter and herder. He makes a wonderful companion dog that will follow you wherever you go. This is an extremely intelligent and active dog that is especially good with children. These dogs insist on being part of the family activities. This breed learns quickly and is eager to please, making them very good therapy dogs; but they are known to be more stubborn making them a little difficult to housetrain.
Tibetan Terrier
  • The Tibetan Terrier stands about 14 to 16 inches high at the shoulder and weighs about 20 to 28 pounds. Its average life expectancy is about 12 to 15 years. Although this breed is called a “terrier”, it actually is not related to a terrier. The breed originated in Tibet where it was regarded as a good luck charm. The Tibetan Terrier is affectionate and loves being with people. They are best suited to homes with school-age children who understand how to properly handle a dog. They do best in homes where they will receive a lot of attention and will not be left alone for long periods of time. The Tibetan Terrier does well with other dogs and pets, especially when they have been raised together. To learn more about the Tibetan Terrier, go to Choosing a Tibetan Terrier.

To learn more about medium size hypoallergenic dogs, go to Try These Medium Size Hypoallergenic Dogs.

These Hypoallergenic Dog Mixes Could Keep Your Sneezes at Bay

Designer dogs or hybrid dogs are becoming more and more popular. If you are an allergy sufferer, consider these hypoallergenic dog mixes. They have little to no shedding, which means less dander to trigger your allergy symptoms.

Labradoodle
  • A cross between the Labrador Retriever and the Poodle breeds, the Labradoodle was originally developed to be a hypoallergenic guide dog. The Labradoodle comes in three different sizes, depending on the size of the Poodle used for the first generation breeding. The Standard Labradoodle stands 22 to 24 inches high and weighs 50 to 65 pounds. The Medium Labradoodle stands 17 to 20 inches high and weighs 30 to 45 pounds. The Miniature Labradoodle stands 14 to 16 inches and weighs about 15 to 25 pounds. It is friendly, playful and intelligent. Its shaggy curly coat does not shed. Intelligent and eager to please, the Labradoodle is easy to train. This is an excellent dog for first-time dog owners. This breed is good with children and other pets. To learn more about the Labradoodle, go to Choosing a Labradoodle.
Schnoodle
  • Developed in the 1980s, the Schnoodle is a cross between a Poodle and a Schnauzer. It was bred to be a low shedding family dog. Since both the Poodle and the Schnauzer come in three different sizes, the size of the Schnoodle can vary greatly, but the average Schnoodle is small, weighing about 20 pounds. This breed can stand from 10 to 26 inches tall and can weigh from 6 to 75 pounds. Schnoodles have no to low shedding, so this is a very good breed for people with allergies. This is a smart, cheerful, active breed that is eager to please. This wonderful family pet is playful and fun-loving. This dog loves to play with children and to be the center of attention. To learn more about the Schnoodle, go to Choosing a Schnoodle.
Yorkipoo
  • This fun-loving designer dog is a cross between the Yorkshire Terrier and a Toy or Miniature Poodle. It stands between 7 and 15 inches at the shoulder and weighs between 3 and 14 pounds. This is an excellent companion dog – loving and fun, he loves being in the company of his family. This is also a good dog for allergy sufferers because it has low dander and is low shedding. This breed is intelligent, making Yorkipoos quick learners – although they do have a stubborn streak. With a gentle and loving disposition, Yorkipoos are good with the elderly and make good therapy dogs.
Maltipoo
  • A cross between the Maltese and a Toy or Miniature Poodle, the Maltipoo stands about 8 to 14 inches high and weighs between 5 and 20 pounds. This designer dog is gentle and very affectionate, making it a good therapy dog. They are great with the elderly and with older children who know how to handle them carefully. Maltipoos can get along with other dogs and pets. Since both the Maltese and the Poodle are hypoallergenic dogs, the Maltipoo sheds very little and is a good choice for people who suffer from allergies. The intelligent Maltipoo is easy to train and is a good dog for first-time dog owners.
Cockapoo
  • The Cockapoo comes in a variety of sizes. The Teacup size stands under 10 inches tall and weighs about 6 pounds. The Toy Cockapoo stands about 10 inches tall and can weigh up to 12 pounds. The Miniature Cockapoo stands between 11 and 14 inches high and weighs 13 to 18 pounds. The Standard Cockapoo stands at least 15 inches high and weighs more than 19 pounds. A cross between the Poodle and the Cocker Spaniel, this dog loves people, children, other dogs, and pets. He is very outgoing and gets along with everyone. This lapdog makes a good therapy dog. The Cockapoo is intelligent and easy to train. This breed hardly sheds at all, making it a good choice for people who suffer from allergies. To learn more about the Cockapoo, go to Choosing a Cockapoo.

To learn more about hypoallergenic dog mixes, go to These Hypoallergenic Dog Mixes Could Keep Your Sneezes at Bay.

All About the Poogle – Choosing a Poogle

The Poogle is a cross between the Poodle and the Beagle. This intelligent dog is warm and friendly and loves to play. The Poogle is an affectionate and very loving dog. On average the Poogle weighs 11 to 25 pounds and stands 9 to 16 inches tall. This hybrid dog has a lifespan of about 10 to 13 years. This breed is great with children. The Poogle is recommended for seniors, singles, and families. This dog is loving and affectionate. Though the exact origin of the breed is not known, it is thought that the Poogle originated in the United States in the 1980s. The Poogle has the beautiful wavy hair of the Poodle and the playful, friendly temperament of a Beagle, making it an ideal companion.

Breed Characteristics

The Poogle gets its characteristics from both the Beagle and the Poodle.

The Beagle is a small, short-haired hound with long ears that lie against the head. The coat colors are a combination of tan, black and white. As with most hounds, the eyes of the Beagle are soft and pleading. The adult beagle is a small breed. In the United States, Beagles are divided into two size categories – 13 to 15 inches at the shoulder, and under 13 inches at the shoulder. Friendly and lovable, the Beagle’s tail is perpetually wagging. The breed is not aggressive. They are intelligent, good-natured and docile companions. To learn more about the Beagle, go to Choosing a Beagle.

For centuries, the Poodle has been one of the most popular breeds in the world and a symbol of elegance and opulent luxury. The Poodle is associated with France, but many countries have laid claim to the breed. Available in three different sizes and many different colors, there is a Poodle for every taste. The Poodle is a pleasant dog that loves constant company. This dog hates to be alone and prefers the company of people instead of other dogs. The breed also hates to be ignored and does not like being thought of or treated as “just a dog.” They make excellent pets for children as well as the elderly. To learn more about the Poodle, go to Choosing a Poodle.

The Poogle is a low maintenance dog with low shedding. Poogles with short hair require less grooming. You will need to brush them about once a week. Poogles with longer hair will require more frequent grooming. The type of coat the Poogle has will depend in large part upon its breeding. The coat is most often a cross between the dense, curly coat of the Poodle and the short coat of the Beagle. Wavy facial hair is quite common. The Poogle comes in a variety of colors including white, black, brown, tan, gray and combination color coats.

You will not get excessive barking with a Poogle, however, a Poogle is a good watchdog and will alert you to anything suspicious.

A highly intelligent dog, the Poogle is easy to train and eager to please his master. They are quick to pick up tricks and they love to show off. They do well with both children and other household pets, however, they should be socialized from an early age to interact with other pets. When not socialized, they have a natural tendency to chase cats and small animals, so early socialization is key.

The Poogle is an energetic dog that requires plenty of exercise. A Poogle should have daily walks and plenty of playtime to avoid boredom and behavior problems.

Recommendations

The Poogle makes a great family pet and is excellent with children. This breed is recommended for children, seniors, singles, families, and households with additional pets.

This dog is loving, affectionate and playful. Poogles require plenty of mental stimulation as well as exercise. The Poogle is an active dog that requires daily walks. This breed especially loves to play so make sure to spend plenty of time engaged in play and games. The Poogle loves to play with other pets as well.

This is a healthy breed with few health concerns. Obesity, dental problems, and ear infections are among the most common health problems with the Poogle breed.

To learn more about Poodle mixes, go to Oodles of Fun: These Breeds Are Dogs Mixed with Poodles.

All About the Broodle Griffon: Choosing a Broodle Griffon

The Broodle Griffon is a playful little dog that is friendly and affectionate. He loves spending time with his humans. Highly intelligent and eager to please, this dog is easily trained. It is recommended for first-time dog owners and for families with children and other pets. The adult Broodle Griffon weighs only 7 to 15 pounds and stands about 7 to 9 inches tall. It has an average lifespan between 10 and 15 years. There is little to no shedding with a Broodle Griffon. He has a tendency to bark when he is anxious and does not do well when left alone for long periods of time.

Breed Characteristics

The Broodle Griffon gets its characteristics from both the Brussels Griffon and the Poodle.

Brussels Griffon

The Brussels Griffon is a dog with lots of personality and an almost human facial expression. On first glance, it appears to have an elfin or monkey face and it is a devoted family pet. The Brussels Griffon is a small sturdy dog with a stout body. The most important characteristic of the breed is his almost human facial expression. The Brussels Griffon has two different coat types: rough and smooth. The coat colors can be red, beige, black and tan or black. The adult Brussels Griffon stands around 7 to 8 inches at the shoulder and weighs about 6 to 12 pounds. It has a lively spirit and a big heart. He loves his family, but if not trained properly he can be moody. They make wonderful family companions and are very affectionate, but they can be high-strung and demanding. This breed does well with older children but should be closely supervised with small children. The Brussels Griffon can do well with other family pets if raised with them. To learn more about the Brussels Griffon, go to Choosing a Brussels Griffon.

For centuries, the Poodle has been one of the most popular breeds in the world and a symbol of elegance and opulent luxury. The Poodle is associated with France, but many countries have laid claim to the breed. Available in three different sizes and many different colors, there is a Poodle for every taste. The Poodle is a pleasant dog that loves constant company. This dog hates to be alone and prefers the company of people instead of other dogs. The breed also hates to be ignored and does not like being thought of or treated as “just a dog.” They make excellent pets for children as well as the elderly. To learn more about the Poodle, go to Choosing a Poodle.

The Broodle Griffon is a smart and well behaved little dog. Eager to please, they love human attention and they love to cuddle. They have a charming and affectionate nature. All they want is your love in return.

They do not like being left alone for long periods of time. Due to their small size, they do not require a lot of exercise. A daily walk and some indoor playtime should be fine, although access to a fenced yard would make the Broodle Griffon very happy. This is a good dog for apartment living, except for barking issues.

Highly intelligent, this dog is easy to train. The Broodle Griffon is eager to please and should respond well to training.

This hypoallergenic breed is considered to be low to moderate in terms of shedding, depending on which coat characteristics it has inherited. He is pretty low maintenance, requiring brushing only once or twice a week.

Recommendations

The Broodle Griffon is recommended for first-time dog owners, families with children, families with other pets, seniors and singles. Because of the Broodle Griffon’s small size, it is important to teach small children to handle them with care. Rough handling could cause the Broodle Griffon to become seriously injured.

This breed does well in either a home or an apartment, however barking issues may be a problem for apartment living. The Broodle Griffon has a tendency to bark when he gets anxious.

This breed is extremely affectionate and eager to please. He is playful and good-natured. He loves to cuddle and spend time with his human pack. While he is friendly, he may not immediately warm up to strangers.

The Broodle Griffon does not do well when left alone for long periods of time.

This is a healthy breed with very few health issues. The Broodle Griffon may have digestive issues, eye problems or respiratory problems.

To learn more about Poodle mixes, go to Oodles of Fun: These Breeds Are Dogs Mixed with Poodles.

All About the Eskipoo: Choosing a Eskipoo

The Eskipoo is a cross between the American Eskimo dog and the European Poodle. On average, the Eskipoo weighs between 10 and 20 pounds, and it stands about 9 to 15 inches tall. The average life expectancy of the Eskipoo is about 10 to 13 years. This is a very cheerful and affectionate dog with a happy outlook on life. The Eskipoo makes a great companion. They love human companionship and will be sad to see you go. Because of their energetic nature and their tendency to bark, this breed, though small in size, may not be the best choice for apartment living. This breed has the tendency to bark at any unfamiliar sounds, and when left alone for long periods of time.

Breed Characteristics

The Eskipoo gets its characteristics from both the American Eskimo dog and the Poodle.

American Eskimo

According to the American Kennel Club, the American Eskimo dog combines striking good looks with a quick and clever mind in a total brains-and-beauty package. Neither shy nor aggressive, Eskies are always alert and friendly, though a bit conservative when making new friends. This breed is always eager to please. The American Eskimo dog has striking good looks, with beautiful white hair and black eyes. This soft, fluffy dog comes in three different sizes – standard, miniature and toy. The American Eskimo dog is very clever and kid-friendly. On the downside, this dog is a barker and he sheds. This dog may not be the best choice for homes with small children.

For centuries, the Poodle has been one of the most popular breeds in the world and a symbol of elegance and opulent luxury. The Poodle is associated with France, but many countries have laid claim to the breed. Available in three different sizes and many different colors, there is a Poodle for every taste. The Poodle is a pleasant dog that loves constant company. This dog hates to be alone and prefers the company of people instead of other dogs. The breed also hates to be ignored and does not like being thought of or treated as “just a dog.” They make excellent pets for children as well as the elderly. To learn more about the Poodle, go to Choosing a Poodle.

With a mixture of characteristics from the American Eskimo dog and the Poodle, the Eskipoo may require a little patience. It is a smart dog that is pretty easily trained. While they are highly intelligent and eager to please, Eskipoos can also be a bit stubborn. Be patient. Use positive reinforcement and rewards to teach the Eskipoo that you are the leader. To learn more about training your Eskipoo, go to Training Your Puppy.

The most common color for the Eskipoo breed is white, but you may also see some Eskipoos in cream, gray, brown or black. Some Eskipoos will have solid coats with patches of another color.

The amount of shedding and the type of grooming required depends on the type of coat your Eskipoo has. It can be long and thick like an Eskimo dog, curly like a Poodle, or a little of both. Regardless of which type of coat they have, the Eskipoo coat is quite dense. Eskipoos will require plenty of brushing to keep tangles or mats under control. Brushing your Eskipoo 4 to 5 times per week is recommended. This hypoallergenic breed is also recommended for owners with allergies.

Recommendations

Because of their dense coats, Eskipoos do well in cooler weather and do not tolerate warm weather as well.

This small dog is smart, affectionate and easy to train. However, the breed can suffer from separation anxiety and craves constant attention.

With a cheerful and loving disposition, this playful breed is great with children, seniors, singles, families and other pets. They may be a bit reserved around strangers and they may bark at them.

This dog loves to play and will continue to play like a puppy well into its adulthood.

The Eskipoo is a high-energy breed which will require plenty of exercise. They love a good walk and some playtime in the backyard. Make sure to have plenty of toys on hand to keep your Eskipoo entertained.

The Eskipoo loves being in the company of humans and hates to be left alone. This is not the right dog for you if you travel or work long hours. When left alone, the Eskipoo may become destructive or bark excessively.

This is a healthy breed that experiences very few health issues. There is the potential for dental, ear and eye issues such as retinal dysplasia, corneal ulcers, and glaucoma.

All About the Affenpoo – Choosing a Affenpoo

The Affenpoo is a whole lot of love wrapped up in a cute little package. They are affectionate, friendly and full of personality. A mix between the Affenpinscher and the Poodle, the Affenpoo weighs only 7 to 9 pounds and is about 9 to 11 inches tall when bred with a toy Poodle. Depending upon the mix, the Affenpoo may weigh up to 25 pounds and stand up to 20 inches tall. Their small size makes the Affenpoo the perfect dog for apartment or city living. The Affenpoo is well suited to apartments or homes with or without a yard. This designer dog requires very little space, but like any dog, they do need exercise and they love their daily walks. The Affenpoo has an average lifespan of 12 to 16 years.

Breed Characteristics

The Affenpoo is a designer crossbreed from the United States. It was developed in the 1990s and gets its characteristics from both the Affenpinscher and the Poodle.

The Affenpinscher is a very active small dog that loves to play. They are very loving dogs. The Affenpinscher is an extremely intelligent dog but it is also a stubborn dog that can be somewhat difficult to house train. They are very protective of their food, water, and toys. This breed is also fearless. They need to be watched around larger dogs since these diminutive dogs don’t seem to understand that their size is a disadvantage when picking a fight with someone bigger. The Affenpinscher will not back off if attacked by another dog, regardless of its size. To learn more about the Affenpinscher, go to Choosing an Affenpinscher.

For centuries, the Poodle has been one of the most popular breeds in the world and a symbol of elegance and opulent luxury. The Poodle is associated with France, but many countries have laid claim to the breed. Available in three different sizes and many different colors, there is a Poodle for every taste. The Poodle is a pleasant dog that loves constant company. This dog hates to be alone and prefers the company of people instead of other dogs. The breed also hates to be ignored and does not like being thought of or treated as “just a dog.” They make excellent pets for children as well as the elderly. To learn more about the Poodle, go to Choosing a Poodle.

With a mixture of characteristics from the Affenpinscher and the Poodle, the Affenpoo may require a little patience. It is a smart dog that is pretty easily trained. While they are highly intelligent and eager to please, Affenpoos can also be a bit stubborn. Be patient. Use positive reinforcement and rewards to teach the Affenpoo that you are the leader.

About the Affenpoo

The Affenpoo is a great family dog. It is hypoallergenic, so it is good for families with allergies. It has a Poodle’s curls with short to medium coarse, dense hair. This dog will not shed that much and requires little brushing – maybe just once a week. The Affenpoo is usually black, gray or brown in color.

This dog loves to play and enjoys learning new tricks. The Affenpoo is a friendly dog that loves to be in the company of humans. These dogs desire human companionship and are not good at being left alone. This is a loving and loyal family pet that seems to be more easy going than other small dog breeds. They have very clever minds which need to be kept busy. The Affenpoo can sometimes become short-tempered, especially over his belongings.

This breed requires moderate exercise. Keep a good supply of dog toys on hand to keep this playful pup satisfied.

The Affenpoo is a fearless breed that will usually not back down from another dog, regardless of its size. They make very good watchdogs. They will bark if a stranger approaches or at anything that seems suspicious.

The Affenpoo breed is not known to have any major health issues; however, since the Poodle is prone to eye problems and hip dysplasia, these health issues may also affect the Affenpoo. They may also be susceptible to bloating and patellar luxation.

Recommendations

Recommended for seniors, singles, and families with older children, the Affenpoo loves being with humans and older children who know how to handle them gently. However, the Affenpoo is not a good choice for households with small children. They can irritate easily and are known to snap at small children who annoy them.

If you travel a lot or spend long hours away from home, the Affenpoo may not be the right dog for you. This breed is very social and requires a lot of human interaction. When bored and left to their own devices, the Affenpoo may become lonely and depressed, leading to destructive behavior and barking. Keep plenty of toys around to keep your dog entertained. The Affenpoo also needs a lot of mental stimulation. A good puzzle toy is a great idea for an Affenpoo.

Oodles of Fun: These Breeds Are Dogs Mixed with Poodles

Poodles are beautiful dogs with their elegant appearance and their signature curly hair. And they come in three sizes, so they’re perfect for almost any living space. Poodles are highly intelligent dogs, and they don’t shed very much.

For centuries, the Poodle has been one of the most popular breeds in the world and a symbol of elegance and opulent luxury. The Poodle is associated with France, but many countries have laid claim to the breed. Available in three different sizes and many different colors, there is a Poodle for every taste. The Poodle is a pleasant dog that loves constant company. This dog hates to be alone and prefers the company of people instead of other dogs. The breed also hates to be ignored and does not like being thought of or treated as “just a dog.” They make excellent pets for children as well as the elderly. To learn more about the Poodle, go to Choosing a Poodle.

If you’re interested in dogs mixed with poodles, there are many wonderful mixes to be had, from the Cockapoo and the Labradoodle to the Maltipoo and the Golden Doodle. Dogs mixed with Poodles come in all different sizes, shapes, and colors, so you’re sure to find the right mix for you. If you get a Poodle mix, you’re likely to get a dog that is smart, friendly, cute and their coats won’t shed very much.

Here’s a list of some popular dogs mixed with poodles:

  • Cockapoo:  Poodle + Cocker Spaniel
  • Maltipoo:  Poodle + Maltese
  • Labradoodle:  Poodle + Labrador
  • Golden Doodle:  Poodle + Golden Retriever
  • Schnoodle:  Poodle + Schnauzer
  • Peekapoo:  Poodle + Pekingese
  • Yorkipoo: Poodle + Yorkshire Terrier
  • Corgipoo:  Poodle + Corgi
  • Affenpoo:  Poodle + Affenpinscher
  • Aussiepoo:  Poodle + Australian Shepherd
  • Saint Berdoodle:  Poodle + Saint Bernard
  • Jack-A-Poo:  Poodle + Jack Russell Terrier
  • Bassetoodle:  Poodle + Basset Hound
  • Doxiepoo:  Poodle + Dachshund
  • Irish Doodle:  Poodle + Irish Setter
  • Papipoo:  Poodle + Papillon

All About the Affenpoo

The Affenpoo is a whole lot of love wrapped up in a cute little package. They are affectionate, friendly and full of personality. A mix between the Affenpinscher and the Poodle, the Affenpoo weighs only 7 to 9 pounds and is about 9 to 11 inches tall when bred with a toy Poodle. Depending upon the mix, the Affenpoo may weigh up to 25 pounds and stand up to 20 inches tall. Their small size makes the Affenpoo the perfect dog for apartment or city living. The Affenpoo is well suited to apartments or homes with or without a yard. They require very little space, but like any dog they do need exercise and daily walks.

This breed gets its characteristics from both the Poodle and the Affenpinscher. The Affenpinscher is a very active small dog that loves to play. They are very loving dogs. The Affenpinscher is an extremely intelligent dog but it is also a stubborn dog that can be somewhat difficult to house train. They are very protective of their food, water and toys. This breed is also fearless. They need to be watched around larger dogs since these diminutive dogs don’t seem to understand that their size is a disadvantage when picking a fight with someone bigger. The Affenpinscher will not back off if attacked by another dog, regardless of its size. To learn more about the Affenpinscher, go to Choosing an Affenpinscher.

Recommended for seniors, singles and families with older children, the Affenpoo loves being with humans and older children who know how to  handle them gently. However, the Affenpoo is not a good choice for households with small children. They can irritate easily and are known to snap at small children who annoy them.

If you travel a lot or spend long hours away from home, the Affenpoo may not be the right dog for you. This breed is very social and requires lots of interaction. When bored and left to their own devices, the Affenpoo may become lonely and depressed, leading to destructive behavior and barking.

To learn more about the Affenpoo, go to All About the Affenpoo.

All About the Eskipoo

The Eskipoo is a cross between the American Eskimo dog and the European Poodle. On average, the Eskipoo weighs between 10 and 20 pounds, and it stands about 9 to 15 inches tall. The average life expectancy of the Eskipoo is about 10 to 13 years. This is a very cheerful and affectionate dog with a happy outlook on life. The Eskipoo makes a great companion. They love human companionship. Because of their energetic nature and their tendency to bark, this breed, though small in size, may not be the best choice for apartment living. This breed has the tendency to bark at any unfamiliar sounds, and when left alone for long periods of time.

How to Find Full Coverage Pet Insurance

It is very easy to find full pet insurance coverage. However, in order to find full pet insurance coverage, it is important to understand what type of coverage pet insurance provides for our dogs and cats.  Pet insurance plans were designed to cover unexpected and unplanned accidents and illnesses. With the rising costs of pet healthcare, having pet insurance and full pet insurance coverage can ensure that pet owners can provide both important and costly medical care for their dogs and cats.

Full pet insurance or comprehensive pet insurance coverage typically includes both accidents and illnesses and can include: breed and congenital conditions, chronic conditions, cancer, exam fees, alternative therapies and rehabilitation, behavioral therapies, ER and specialist care, hospitalization and surgeries.

The majority of comprehensive pet insurance plans are designed for unplanned accidents and illnesses and don’t cover general pet wellness visits. This is one-way pet health insurance differs from human health. However, many pet insurance plans offer wellness plans, as a stand-alone plan or as an add-on, to provide you with the most comprehensive pet insurance coverage.

Wellness plans typically cover wellness visits and can include: vaccinations, flea/tick prevention, microchipping, blood tests, deworming, etc.  Additionally, almost all of the pet insurance companies and pet insurance policies allow you to visit any licensed veterinarian.

What Does Pet Health Insurance Cover: The Basics.

Pet health insurance is a unique insurance designed to reimburse pet owners for unexpected veterinary fees and related expenses for vet provided health services. There are three main types of pet health insurance coverage:

  • Accident: Coverage for veterinary treatment for unexpected injuries.
  • Illness: Coverage to treat sickness, disease and any changes to your pet’s normal healthy state.
  • Wellness: (also called Routine or Preventive Care) which may include vaccinations, tests, and dental work. This is also sometimes called “Routine” or “Preventative” care.

Here is a sample coverage list. These areas include all three plan levels mentioned above. Note: coverage will vary by plan options and the pet insurance provider.

  • Accidents and injuries
  • Illnesses
  • Veterinary exam fees
  • Imaging – mri, cat scan, ultrasound
  • Diagnostic treatments
  • Prescription medications
  • Cancer treatments
  • Non-routine dental treatments
  • Surgery and rehabilitation
  • Some alternative therapies
  • Behavioral therapies
  • Loss due to theft
  • Advertising and reward
  • Boarding fees
  • Death from illness or injury
  • Vacation cancellation

What’s  Not Covered by Pet Insurance

There are exclusions in every plan and they will vary by provider. It is important to research the exclusion area of any policy for any potential pet insurance plan or provider. You can often find a complete list of exclusions in the terms and conditions section for each pet insurance provider. Below are some samples of potential exclusions:

  • Routine veterinary care
  • Pre-existing conditions
  • Breeding, whelping, and pregnancy
  • Injury caused deliberately by you or any other person residing in your home
  • Injury or illness resulting from fighting, racing, cruelty, or neglect
  • Cosmetic procedures such as tail docking, ear cropping, and dew claw removal unless medically necessary
  • DNA testing or cloning
  • Stem cell therapy not deemed medically necessary
  • Avian flu or nuclear War

What Does Pet Health Insurance Cost

The cost of pet insurance can vary greatly based on the provider and some other important factors. These factors, listed below, can have a big impact on the cost of your pet insurance plan.

  • Location
  • Pet Species
  • Pet’s Breed
  • Pet’s Age
  • Desired Coverage

The average cost of pet insurance tends to be higher for dogs, older animals, and larger animals. Typically in North America, pet insurance for dogs can range from $25-$70 and $10-40 for cats per month.

According to NAPHIA (North American Pet Insurance Association), the industry averages for  monthly plan costs by type and pet are as follows:

Accident Only Plans:

  • Dogs: $14.03
  • Cats: $12.46

Accident and Illness Plans:

  • Dogs: $43.14
  • Cats: $26.77

Additional Tips For Buying Full Coverage Pet Insurance

Enroll Your Pet  When They Are Young – This is one of the best ways to lower the cost of pet insurance. When your pet is young they are less likely to have any pre-existing conditions or any other health issues that might not be covered by pet insurance.

Pick The Coverage and Plan That Is Right For You – Most providers offer a variety of plans and customization options. Explore these areas based on your needs and the needs of your pet –  today and in the future.

Select A Credible Provider – Take the time to research multiple pet insurance providers. Explore how long they’ve been in business and read any customer reviews you can find. You’ll want an experienced and trusted provider with good reviews and ethical customer service practices.

Is Doberman Ear Cropping Necessary?

The adult Doberman pinscher stands 26 to 28 inches at the shoulder and weighs about 60 to 100 pounds. The Doberman has a wedge-shaped head and the ears may or may not be cropped. Uncropped ears naturally hang and the tail is docked. To learn more about the Doberman pinscher, go to Choosing a Doberman Pinscher.

Doberman ear cropping is very common. Ear cropping is a surgical procedure in which a portion of the dog’s ear is removed, producing ears that stand erect. The procedure is most often performed on Doberman puppies at around 8 to 12 weeks of age. The ears are trimmed and the edges are stitched. The ears are then taped to a hard surface for several weeks while they heal. This is done so that the ears will stay upright. The ear cropping should be done by a veterinarian with experience in ear cropping. To learn more about the ear cropping procedure in dogs, go to Ear Cropping for Dogs.

A Doberman whose ears are not cropped takes on a very different appearance. In Dobermans, ear cropping contributes to the breed’s identity and character. It is customary to identify a Doberman pinscher with having cropped ears. Many feel it adds to the breed’s striking appearance. The ear crop style can vary in shape or length. For instance, ear cropping styles include the short crop, the medium crop and the longer crop that is known as the standard show crop.

The Doberman Ear Cropping Procedure

Ear cropping surgery is done under anesthesia and takes about a half hour to complete. The ears will usually stand upright after being taped for 5 or 6 months, although some Dobermans may take up to one year before the ears will fully stand erect. This is especially true with the longer ear crop. The long healing process is more uncomfortable for the dog than the surgery itself, another reason people see the process as cruel and unnecessary. After ear cropping surgery, proper after care is essential to prevent infection and to ensure that the ears will stand upright. If the owner is unwilling to commit to such a lengthy after care, they should not engage in the ear cropping procedure.

To Crop or Not to Crop

When the procedure first began it was done for functional reasons. The Doberman was a guard dog. Having ears stand upright allowed for increased sound. This was an important feature for a watchdog. Today, ear cropping in Dobermans is usually done to comply with show standards or simply for the owner’s personal preference.

Ear cropping is an elective surgery for dogs. It’s a choice. It has no known health benefit and is done solely at the dog owner’s preference. Ear cropping in the Doberman breed has long been routinely done to achieve a certain appearance. Ear cropping is outlawed in some countries. And while this routine procedure is not banned or regulated in the United States, it is becoming more controversial. Some states are considering legislation to ban ear cropping, but they have not yet done so.

The American Kennel Club (AKC) says that ear cropping is “integral to defining and preserving breed character” in certain breeds like the Doberman pinscher, but the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) opposes ear cropping in dogs. Because the procedure is purely cosmetic, they believe it poses unnecessary risks to the dog.

Ear cropping is becoming less common. It is not taught in many veterinary schools. Fewer veterinarians are willing to perform the surgery, and dog owners are becoming more aware of the controversial nature of the surgical procedure. If your Doberman competes, you should know that the AKC says dogs without docked tails or cropped ears are just as likely to win at dog shows.

To learn more about the Doberman pinscher, go to Everything Your Family Needs to Know About the Doberman Breed.

What You Need to Know About the Doberman Breed’s Health History

One of the most serious breed-related health problems in the Doberman breed is cardiomyopathy, which causes an enlarged heart. Dobermans suffer from cardiomyopathy more than any other dog breed. The diseased heart muscles become enlarged and weak, making it harder and harder for the heart to pump blood. Eventually affected dogs die from heart failure. Early signs of the disease might include depression, coughing, exercise intolerance, weakness, respiratory distress, decreased appetite and even fainting. However, many dogs with this condition are asymptomatic. To help catch this condition early, you should have your dog examined every year. No dog with cardiomyopathy should ever be bred, however, a puppy of two parents without the disease can still develop it.

Cervical vertebral instability (CVI), commonly known as Wobbler’s disease, is another breed-related condition affecting the Doberman breed. In this condition, the vertebrae in the neck are malformed. This puts pressure on the spinal cord, which leads to weakness in the hindquarters and a wobbly gait. In dogs that are not severely affected, symptoms can be managed to a certain extent, and some dogs may experience some relief from surgery. Sometimes complete paralysis results.

Top Conditions and Diseases for Dobermans

Here’s what you need to know about Doberman health. In general, the Doberman is a healthy dog with few medical concerns. However, the following diseases or disorders have been reported:

  • Wobbler’s disease is a malformation of the bones in the neck resulting in neck pain and a characteristic wobbly gait.
  • Gastric torsion, also known as bloat, is a life-threatening sudden illness associated with the stomach filling with air and twisting.
  • Hip dysplasia is a malformation of the hip joint that results in pain, lameness and arthritis.
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy is a serious heart condition that results in a large, thin walled heart muscle.
  • Hypothyroidism results when the thyroid gland does not function adequately to produce adequate amounts of thyroid hormone.
  • Von Willebrand’s disease is a disorder that results in the inability to clot blood. Affected animals will bleed extensively following trauma or surgery.
  • Melanoma is a tumor arising from melanocytes, which are the cells that produce pigment.
  • Cutaneous Histiocytoma – is a benign tumor of the skin that can affect young dogs.
  • Lipomas are benign fatty tumors of the subcutaneous tissue.
  • Fibrosarcoma is a type of cancer that arises from the fibrous connective tissues.
  • Alopecia is a disorder resulting in a loss of hair.
  • Cataracts cause a loss of the normal transparency of the lens of the eye. The problem can occur in one or both eyes and can lead to blindness.
  • Entropion is a problem with the eyelid that causes inward rolling. Lashes on the edge of the eyelid irritate the surface of the eyeball and may lead to more serious problems.
  • Diabetes is a disease of the pancreas related to insufficient amounts of insulin production.
  • Lick granuloma is a condition in which the dog licks an area excessively, usually on the front leg, until a raised, firm ulcerated lesion is formed.
  • Parvovirus is a devastating gastrointestinal virus that primarily affects unvaccinated puppies.
  • Chronic hepatitis is a chronic and progressive inflammation of the liver of dogs that leads eventually to the replacement of normal liver tissue with scar tissue.
  • Portosystemic shunt (PSS) is a malformation of the blood flow associated with the liver. Blood is shunted away from the liver, resulting in accumulation of blood toxins and subsequent profound illness.
  • Drug reaction to a group of drugs called “sulphonamides” may cause skin reactions and polyarthritis in this breed.
  • In addition, the Doberman is prone to acne, osteosarcoma and elbow dysplasia.

Choosing a Doberman Puppy

To increase the chances that you will be getting a healthy puppy, choose a reputable breeder. Start your search for a good breeder at the Doberman Pinscher Club of America website. Locate a breeder who has agreed to abide by its Code of Ethics. Get your puppy from a breeder who has DPCA Working Aptitude certification for his parents.

Careful breeders screen their dogs for genetic diseases and breed only the best specimens. Still, there are no guarantees that the puppy will not develop one of these conditions despite good breeding practices.

You may also want to consider getting an adult dog from a shelter or a rescue group since many Doberman health defects can hide until maturity.

Take your puppy or adult Doberman to the veterinarian soon after you adopt. Your vet will be able to spot signs of potential problems and to help you set up a regimen to help avoid many health risks.