A white and red Cavalier King Charles Spaniel wags its tail/
A white and red Cavalier King Charles Spaniel wags its tail/

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

avatarStephanie Lenoir LVT, VTS (ECC)

Height10 - 15"
Weight15 - 20 Ibs
TypeToy
Life Expectancy9 - 14 years
Area of OriginGreat Britain

Energy Level

Playfulness

Friendliness to dogs

Friendliness to strangers

exercise requirements

affection level

friendliness to other pets

watchfulness

Grooming Requirements

Vocality

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is truly the sweetheart of the animal kingdom. They make wonderful companion animals because of their loving and relaxed personalities. They are very gentle and affectionate pets, making them the ideal lap dog. Some people say that they are the "King" of the affectionate breeds and require a lot of human interaction. They also get along well with children and other pets, making them excellent therapy dogs. Because of their small size, they can travel well and are suited for apartment living. If you are looking for a cuddle buddy, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel may be the perfect pet for you.

Energy Level

Playfulness

Friendliness to dogs

Friendliness to strangers

exercise requirements

affection level

friendliness to other pets

watchfulness

Grooming Requirements

Vocality

Where Are Cavalier King Charles Spaniels From?

Tapestries and paintings as far back as the 1400s have depicted small, spaniel-like canines. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is modeled after these ancient spaniels and is thought to have originated from the larger King Charles Spaniel.

This dog was a favorite of the aristocracy, but upon the fall of the House of Stuart, the popularity of the breed rapidly declined. They were associated with luxury and wealth and seemed to have no purpose but as companions. At that time, the middle class could not afford to feed and care for a dog that didn’t work. In addition, William and Mary, rulers at that time, preferred the Pug, so association with the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was thought by some to be a political liability.

The breed’s fortunes improved during the reign of Queen Victoria. However, during her breeding and promoting of the small spaniel, the appearance of the dog was altered. The head became more domed and the dog was eventually renamed the English Toy Spaniel. This resulted in a near extinction of the flatter-headed Cavalier. In the 1920s, in an effort to restore the breed back to its original appearance, an American named Roswell Eldridge offered a financial prize for the best dog or bitch of the “old type.” He offered this prize for 5 years.

Thanks to his offer, the breed was restored to its original form. By 1928, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club was founded in England and the breed was recognized by the English Kennel Club in 1944. By the middle of the 20th century, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was one of the most popular breeds in England. By 1996, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was recognized by the American Kennel Club as a member of the Toy Group.

Where Are Cavalier King Charles Spaniels From?

Tapestries and paintings as far back as the 1400s have depicted small, spaniel-like canines. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is modeled after these ancient spaniels and is thought to have originated from the larger King Charles Spaniel.

This dog was a favorite of the aristocracy, but upon the fall of the House of Stuart, the popularity of the breed rapidly declined. They were associated with luxury and wealth and seemed to have no purpose but as companions. At that time, the middle class could not afford to feed and care for a dog that didn’t work. In addition, William and Mary, rulers at that time, preferred the Pug, so association with the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was thought by some to be a political liability.

The breed’s fortunes improved during the reign of Queen Victoria. However, during her breeding and promoting of the small spaniel, the appearance of the dog was altered. The head became more domed and the dog was eventually renamed the English Toy Spaniel. This resulted in a near extinction of the flatter-headed Cavalier. In the 1920s, in an effort to restore the breed back to its original appearance, an American named Roswell Eldridge offered a financial prize for the best dog or bitch of the “old type.” He offered this prize for 5 years.

Thanks to his offer, the breed was restored to its original form. By 1928, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club was founded in England and the breed was recognized by the English Kennel Club in 1944. By the middle of the 20th century, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was one of the most popular breeds in England. By 1996, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was recognized by the American Kennel Club as a member of the Toy Group.

Care

What Kind of Diet Does a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Need?

The Cavalier requires a well-balanced diet to keep them in good health. It is important to not feed a grain-free diet, as this could contribute to heart disease. This is a breed that is prone to obesity, so it is important that you monitor caloric intake. You should consult with your veterinarian to help develop an appropriate meal plan.

Caring for a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

What Kind of Diet Does a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Need?

How Much Grooming Does a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Need?

Are Cavalier King Charles Spaniels Healthy Dogs?

How Much Training Does a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Need?

How Much Exercise Does a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Need?

What Kind of Diet Does a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Need?

The Cavalier requires a well-balanced diet to keep them in good health. It is important to not feed a grain-free diet, as this could contribute to heart disease. This is a breed that is prone to obesity, so it is important that you monitor caloric intake. You should consult with your veterinarian to help develop an appropriate meal plan.

What Are the Physical Characteristics of a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel?

The Cavalier is the sweetheart of the dog world. They are considered a toy breed and can stand 10 to 15 inches tall, with an average weight of 15 to 20 pounds. They have long, folded, high-set ears that are covered with lustrous, feathery hair.

The breed’s eyes are dark brown, large, and round, giving them a soft, sensitive expression. They have a slightly rounded, but domed, head. Their facial expression and affectionate eyes are their calling card.

The Cavalier neck is fairly long, arched, and muscular. Shoulders slope downward, giving the breed an air of distinction, while the body is short with a deep, broad chest.

No, the Cavalier’s tail is lengthy, smooth, and prominently feathered.

The forelegs are straight and elbows are kept close to the frame. The dewclaws can be removed within 2 to 5 days of birth by a veterinarian. The paws are compact and cushioned.

The breed’s coat may include chestnut markings atop a white background, black-and-tan markings atop a white background, or be thoroughly black and tan. They have a double hair coat, and shed their under coat during the summer months.

The hindquarters are muscular, and boast a broad pelvis and well-aligned limbs. Their appearance and structure provide the breed with an elegant gait.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Facts

1

The name "Cavalier King Charles" came from King Charles II, who adored the breed. After King Charles passed away, the breeds popularity faded in favor of the Pug. In an effort to capitalize on the fame of both dogs, breeders crossbred Pugs and Cavaliers, spawning a dog with a shorter muzzle and more domed head, which is how the breed appears today.

2

Frank Sinatra adored his Cavalier King Charles Spaniels. Rumor has it that "Strangers in the Night" was written in their honor.

3

Despite public opinion, there is no proof that King Charles II passed a law allowing Cavalier King Charles Spaniels access to any establishment in the United Kingdom, including churches and castles.

Other Breeds to Explore

Maltese
Papillon
Pekingese

References

  • Morris, Desmond. Dogs: The Ultimate Dictionary of Over 1,000 Dog Breeds. Trafalgar Square, 2002.
  • American Kennel Club. The Complete Dog Book. Random House Digital, Inc., 2006.
  • Wilcox, Bonnie and Chris Walkowicz. The Atlas of Dog Breeds of the World. T.F.H Publications, Inc., 1995.
  • Shops centre ban for ‘royal’ dog. Manchester Evening News, 2013.

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