Holiday Gift Guide

breed
breed

Jack Russell Terrier

avatarAlanna Mallory, BS, LVT, VTS (SAIM)

Height12 - 15"
Weight13 - 17 lbs
TypeTerrier
Life Expectancy13 - 16 years
Area of OriginGreat Britain

Energy Level

Playfulness

Friendliness to dogs

Friendliness to strangers

exercise requirements

affection level

friendliness to other pets

watchfulness

Grooming Requirements

Vocality

The Jack Russell Terrier, also known as the Parson Russell Terrier, is a high-energy, intelligent dog that was bred primarily to hunt foxes. Their compact body and quickness is what makes them effective hunters. Jack Russells have a strong prey drive that does not always mix well with small children, as they sometimes confuse kids for quarry. However, they can be incredibly affectionate with older children that understand this particular breed's behavior. Their independent nature and prey drive make them best suited for single-pet households. They have a history of killing small animals, such as chickens, cats, and other dogs. This lively, little breed would be perfect for a family that enjoys hiking, long walks, and being outdoors. Keeping this breed active and entertained will help keep them out of trouble. Early obedience training is a must for this hyperactive breed.

Energy Level

Playfulness

Friendliness to dogs

Friendliness to strangers

exercise requirements

affection level

friendliness to other pets

watchfulness

Grooming Requirements

Vocality

Where Are Jack Russell Terriers From?

The Jack Russell Terrier originated in the mid-1800s in England. Reverend John Russell was a fox hunter at that time and began a breeding program. He is referred to as the “father of the Wirehaired Fox Terrier” and as the “Sporting Parson,” since he bred his own strain of White Fox Terriers. The Jack Russell Terriers of today share physical similarities to Russell’s dogs.

Since then, cross breeding has resulted in variations within the breed, such as short legs, long legs, and big chests. There may have also been an addition of fighting bulls and terriers to increase aggressiveness for hunting. The Jack Russell was imported to the United States in the 1930s and The Jack Russell Terrier Club of America was established in 1976. The breed was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1998.

Where Are Jack Russell Terriers From?

The Jack Russell Terrier originated in the mid-1800s in England. Reverend John Russell was a fox hunter at that time and began a breeding program. He is referred to as the “father of the Wirehaired Fox Terrier” and as the “Sporting Parson,” since he bred his own strain of White Fox Terriers. The Jack Russell Terriers of today share physical similarities to Russell’s dogs.

Since then, cross breeding has resulted in variations within the breed, such as short legs, long legs, and big chests. There may have also been an addition of fighting bulls and terriers to increase aggressiveness for hunting. The Jack Russell was imported to the United States in the 1930s and The Jack Russell Terrier Club of America was established in 1976. The breed was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1998.

Care

What Kind of Diet Does a Jack Russell Terrier Need?

The Jack Russell Terrier should be fed a breed- and age-appropriate diet. This high-energy dog may burn a lot of calories, so be sure to monitor their weight. However, as with any breed, the Jack Russell can also become obese, so monitoring of caloric intake is essential!

Caring for a Jack Russell Terrier

What Kind of Diet Does a Jack Russell Terrier Need?

How Much Grooming Does a Jack Russell Terrier Need?

Are Jack Russell Terriers Healthy Dogs?

When Should I Start Training My Jack Russell Terrier?

How Much Exercise Does a Jack Russell Terrier Need?

What Kind of Diet Does a Jack Russell Terrier Need?

The Jack Russell Terrier should be fed a breed- and age-appropriate diet. This high-energy dog may burn a lot of calories, so be sure to monitor their weight. However, as with any breed, the Jack Russell can also become obese, so monitoring of caloric intake is essential!

What Are the Physical Characteristics of a Jack Russell Terrier?

Jack Russell Terriers stand 12 – 15″ high and weigh 13 – 17 pounds. They are a compact, muscular hunting breed with a rough or smooth weatherproof coat. Their V-shaped ears and intelligent facial expression are characteristic of the breed.

A Jack Russell’s head is proportionate to the body, featuring dark-rimmed, almond-shaped eyes. They have V-shaped ears that fold at the level of the skull and drop down.

Yes, Jack Russell Terriers sport a compact, athletic body built for agility and hunting.

Jack Russell tails are docked for fashion and competitive purposes. The tail is held upwards when moving and level when at rest.

The Jack Russell has strong, straight forelimbs set well underneath the body, which feature cat-like, rounded paws.

Jack Russell Terriers should be at least 50% white with tri-colored markings (black and brown). Their weatherproof double coat can be rough, smooth, or broken (short wire).

Jack Russell Terriers have muscular hindlegs with low-set hocks that are parallel to the ground. They have cat-like hind paws.

Jack Russell Terrier Facts

1

A Jack Russell Terrier was featured in the famous painting His Master's Voice, in which a dog is staring into a phonograph. This image has been used in advertising for many record labels, including RCA.

2

A Jack Russell played "Eddie" on the hit TV show Frasier.

3

The breed's name was officially changed to Parson Russell Terrier in 2003 by the Russell Terrier Association of America.

Other Breeds to Explore

Choosing a Smooth Fox Terrier
Choosing a Toy Fox Terrier
Choosing an Irish Terrier

References

  • Morris, Desmond. Dogs: The Ultimate Dictionary of Over 1,000 Dog Breeds. Trafalgar Square, 2002.
  • American Kennel Club. The Complete Dog Book. Random House Digital, Inc., 2006.
  • Wilcox, Bonnie and Chris Walkowicz. The Atlas of Dog Breeds of the World. T.F.H Publications, Inc., 1995.
  • Parson Russell Terrier Dog Breed Information. American Kennel Club, 2020.

Get the best of PetPlace straight to your inbox.

By signing up, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.