A smiling Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier.
A smiling Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier.

Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier

avatarCarey Hemmelgarn, DVM DACVECC

Height17 - 19"
Weight30 - 40 lbs
TypeTerrier
Life Expectancy12 - 14 years
Area of OriginIreland

Energy Level

Playfulness

Friendliness to dogs

Friendliness to strangers

exercise requirements

affection level

friendliness to other pets

watchfulness

Grooming Requirements

Vocality

The Soft-Coated Wheaten is a long-legged terrier best known for its hard-working spirit around the farm. Wheatens have high energy and are highly intelligent, traits that make them excellent working companions. They have a single coat, which makes them less allergenic than most breeds, since shedding is infrequent. They love to exercise and are always looking for a workout partner or job to do.

Energy Level

Playfulness

Friendliness to dogs

Friendliness to strangers

exercise requirements

affection level

friendliness to other pets

watchfulness

Grooming Requirements

Vocality

Where Are Soft-Coated Wheaten Terriers From?

Wheatens were first recorded in 1785 in Kerry County, Ireland, where they were bred to be helpful farm hands. They are close relatives to the Kerry Blue Terrier and Irish Terrier, distinguishing themselves by having long legs and a soft, wheat-colored hair coat. Around the farm, they would guard poultry, herd livestock, manage the pest population, and hunt.

The breed was first recognized by the Irish Kennel Club in 1937 and by the American Kennel Club in 1973. They were first bought to the United States in 1940 by Lydia Vogel of Massachusetts. Seven years later, the first Soft-Coated Wheaten was shown at Westminster.

Where Are Soft-Coated Wheaten Terriers From?

Wheatens were first recorded in 1785 in Kerry County, Ireland, where they were bred to be helpful farm hands. They are close relatives to the Kerry Blue Terrier and Irish Terrier, distinguishing themselves by having long legs and a soft, wheat-colored hair coat. Around the farm, they would guard poultry, herd livestock, manage the pest population, and hunt.

The breed was first recognized by the Irish Kennel Club in 1937 and by the American Kennel Club in 1973. They were first bought to the United States in 1940 by Lydia Vogel of Massachusetts. Seven years later, the first Soft-Coated Wheaten was shown at Westminster.

Care

What Kind of Diet Does a Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier Need?

Wheatens tend to have an abundance of energy and should be fed a balanced, age-appropriate diet. As with most breeds, they’re capable of becoming obese, so calorie intake should be monitored closely.

Caring for a Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier

What Kind of Diet Does a Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier Need?

How Much Grooming Does a Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier Need?

Are Soft-Coated Wheaten Terriers Healthy?

How Much Training Does a Wheaten Terrier Need?

How Much Exercise Do Wheatens Need?

What Kind of Diet Does a Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier Need?

Wheatens tend to have an abundance of energy and should be fed a balanced, age-appropriate diet. As with most breeds, they’re capable of becoming obese, so calorie intake should be monitored closely.

What Are the Physical Characteristics of a Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier?

Soft-Coated Wheaten Terriers are a medium-sized dog that is sturdy in appearance. They have a soft and wavy wheat-colored hair coat that lightens as they age.

Wheaten Terriers have a rectangular-shaped head with a moderate muzzle. Their ears are small to medium size and sit on the top of the head in a v-shape.

Wheatens have a strong, proportional body and flat back. The chest cavity is slightly-rounded and abdomen tucked upward.

Wheaten Terriers have a tail that stands upright and slightly curves over the lower back.

The forequarters are straight with solid bone structure. Shoulders are slightly laid back and dewclaws are commonly removed from the forelimbs.

Soft-Coated Wheaten Terriers are commonly brown, chocolate, or white. Their coats may lighten to a wheat color as they age.

The hindquarters are well-muscled, with a slight bend in the stifles.

Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier Facts

1

Frederic William Burton included a Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier in his famous painting “The Aran Fisherman’s Drowned Child.”

2

Soft-Coated Wheaten Terriers are often called the “poor man’s wolfhound,” since they were the working class dog of choice in Ireland and wolfhounds were incredibly expensive.

3

Wheatens are known as An Brocaire Bui in Ireland, which translates to "the yellow terrier."

Other Breeds to Explore

Choosing a Kerry Blue Terrier
Choosing an Irish Terrier
Standard Schnauzer

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