A portrait of a Yorkshire Terrier.
A portrait of a Yorkshire Terrier.

Yorkshire Terrier

avatarStephanie Lenoir LVT, VTS (ECC)

Height8-9"
Weight6-7 lbs
TypeToy
Life Expectancy13-16 years
Area of OriginGreat Britain

Energy Level

Playfulness

Friendliness to dogs

Friendliness to strangers

exercise requirements

affection level

friendliness to other pets

watchfulness

Grooming Requirements

Vocality

The Yorkshire Terrier is an extremely intelligent, energetic, and confident breed. They are a loving and devoted canine capable of being a great family pet. Yorkshire Terriers also make great apartment animals, due to their toy-breed size. They're brave despite their small stature, making them the perfect watch or alert dog. Their appearance is rather regal, due to their long, silky hair, and they love being a pampered pet, even allowing owners to carry them in shoulder bags.  

Energy Level

Playfulness

Friendliness to dogs

Friendliness to strangers

exercise requirements

affection level

friendliness to other pets

watchfulness

Grooming Requirements

Vocality

Where Is the Yorkshire Terrier From?

The Yorkshire Terrier originated in northern England in the mid-19th century. Workers from Scotland came to Yorkshire county in England looking for work in mines. These workers brought different type of small terriers with them, such as the Waterside Terrier and the Scottish Clydesdale Terrier. These breeds were then bred together in Yorkshire, hence the name Yorkshire Terrier (also called the Yorkie). They were first developed to catch rats in the mines, gaining a reputation as little exterminators.

The Yorkie was eventually brought to North America in 1872, where breeding changed them from little exterminators to loving, companion pets. The Yorkshire Terrier was approved and registered by the American Kennel Club in 1885, and they would eventually become one of the most popular breeds in the United States.

Where Is the Yorkshire Terrier From?

The Yorkshire Terrier originated in northern England in the mid-19th century. Workers from Scotland came to Yorkshire county in England looking for work in mines. These workers brought different type of small terriers with them, such as the Waterside Terrier and the Scottish Clydesdale Terrier. These breeds were then bred together in Yorkshire, hence the name Yorkshire Terrier (also called the Yorkie). They were first developed to catch rats in the mines, gaining a reputation as little exterminators.

The Yorkie was eventually brought to North America in 1872, where breeding changed them from little exterminators to loving, companion pets. The Yorkshire Terrier was approved and registered by the American Kennel Club in 1885, and they would eventually become one of the most popular breeds in the United States.

Care

How Often Should I Feed a Yorkie Puppy?

A balanced diet is essential for Yorkshire Terriers. Yorkie puppies need to be fed at least 4 times a day to prevent hypoglycemia, since they are unable to maintain their blood sugar at this age. Adult dogs need to be fed twice a day with a high-quality diet. Check with your veterinarian to see what brand of food they recommend for this breed. Dry food is always a good choice, since Yorkies are prone to dental disease.

Caring for a Yorkshire Terrier

How Often Should I Feed a Yorkie Puppy?

How Often Should I Brush My Yorkshire Terrier

Are Yorkshire Terriers Healthy Dogs?

Can You Train a Yorkie?

How Much Exercise Does a Yorkie Need?

How Often Should I Feed a Yorkie Puppy?

A balanced diet is essential for Yorkshire Terriers. Yorkie puppies need to be fed at least 4 times a day to prevent hypoglycemia, since they are unable to maintain their blood sugar at this age. Adult dogs need to be fed twice a day with a high-quality diet. Check with your veterinarian to see what brand of food they recommend for this breed. Dry food is always a good choice, since Yorkies are prone to dental disease.

What Are the Physical Characteristics of a Yorkshire Terrier?

These toy-breed dogs are small in size, weighing around 6 to 7 pounds, but not exceeding 7 pounds. They have a long, luxurious haircoat that is tan and steel blue to gray in color. They stand about 8 to 9 inches tall from the shoulder to the ground. They stand and strut with confidence.

A Yorkie’s head is tiny and level on top. The muzzle is of medium length, with a black nose. Ears should stand up straight like a V, and will be heavily coated with hair and tan in color. They have dark eyes that sit balanced on the face.

A Yorkie’s body is compact, straight, and covered in hair.

Yorkies are born with a long tail, but breed standard requires docking within days of birth by a veterinarian.

The front legs are straight and line up with the shoulders. They are rather petite in size.

Yorkies do not shed, but they require considerable maintenance from their owners. Their hair is long, glossy, and silky. The coat is straight and trimmed to floor length, which provides a neat appearance. Puppies are black and tan, while adult dogs have a dark, steel blue color on the body and tan around the head, face, neck, and chest.

Back legs are also straight. If observed from behind, the knees are ever so slightly bent inward.

Yorkshire Terrier Facts

1

This breed was first named the "Broken-Haired Scotch Terrier" in the early 1900s.

2

The Yorkie was the first bred to be a therapy dog. Bill Wynne was a soldier in WWII that found a Yorkie in a foxhole in New Guinea. Wynne named the dog Smoky and she stayed with him throughout the war. After the war, she traveled back to the United States with him to visit hospitals as a therapy dog to help wounded soldiers.

3

Actress and humanitarian Audrey Hepburn had a Yorkie named Mr. Famous. He appeared in many photographs with her, as well as starring in a scene in "Funny Faces." It is said that she and Mr. Famous started the Hollywood trend of having a Yorkie as a lapdog.

Other Breeds to Explore

Choosing a Silky Terrier
Choosing a Cairn Terrier
Bichon Frise

References

  • Morris, Desmond. Dog: The Ultimate Dictionary of Over 1,000 Dog Breeds. Trafalgar Square, 2002
  • American Kennel Club. The Complete Dog Book. Random House Digital, Inc., 2006
  • Wilcox, Bonnie, and Chris Walkowicz. The Atlas of Dog Breeds of the World. T.F.H Publications, Inc., 1995

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