Harnesses, Collars, and Halters, Oh My!

Dog Behavior & Training > Training Your Dog >
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Dog Collar Safety

Dog collars can be dangerous in certain situations. Watch your dog after you place a new collar on him. If he can insert his lower jaw under the collar, it may be too large or too loose. Additionally, large tags can get caught in your dog’s crate. Dogs can get entangled with each other while playing, and tags and collars can get caught on crates or fences.

You should never keep a harness on your pet while he’s playing or unsupervised. Always remove collars and harnesses when dogs are playing together. It can be tough to rescue two dogs that are hurt and frightened. Therefore, it’s best to prevent them from getting tangled up in the first place. Harnesses should only be used for walks and training.

Some dog collars have safety buckles that release when they’re exposed to too much pressure. These can get your dog out of a hazardous situation. However, they can also come apart by accident. You should consider using a separate harness or halter for walking the dog so that your pet doesn’t slip out of the safety collar.

Even if training harnesses restrict your dog’s ability to pull against a lead, you should never jerk the leash roughly. Take the time to train your dog to walk on a loose leash. The American Kennel Club offers some tips for loose-leash walk training. Your dog is never too old to learn how to go for a leisurely walk with his best friend.

Getting Your Pup Used to A New Collar

If you’re trying out a new device, introduce your dog to it slowly. Put the collar or harness on during mealtimes or just before a walk. When the dog associates it with a reward, he’ll be more likely to wear it. Most experts suggest using gentle and positive reinforcement when familiarizing your pet with something new or performing training. Prong, pinch and choke collars are not recommended. Have questions, comments, or concerns? Contacts us today.


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