Structure and Function of the Male Canine Reproductive Tract

Share

Below is information about the structure and function of the canine male reproductive tract. We will tell you about the general structure of the reproductive tract, how it work in dogs, common diseases that affect the reproductive tract and common diagnostic tests performed in male dogs to evaluate the reproductive tract. 

What Is the Reproductive Tract?

The male canine reproductive tract consists of the male genital organs including the scrotum, the two testes (normally located within the scrotum), the epididymides, the deferent ducts (tube that leads from the epididymis to the urethra), the spermatic cords, the prostate (an accessory gland), the penis and the urethra (the common passageway of urine and semen).

Where Is the Canine Male Reproductive Tract Located?

The scrotum is located approximately two-thirds of the distance from the opening of the prepuce (the sheath of skin that covers the penis) to the anus. It lies on the back portion of the abdomen between the hind legs.

The testes, or testicles, are normally located within the scrotum. The left testicle usually lies slightly behind the right. Each testicle is oval in shape and thicker in the middle than from side to side.

The epididymis is an enlarged tube positioned along the edge of the testicle. Its beginning and end (head and tail) are located at the front and back of the testicle, respectively. There is one epididymis for each testicle.

The deferent duct or ductus deferens begins at the tail of the epididymis and runs along the border of the testicle, entering into the abdominal cavity through an area called the inguinal canal. It passes through the prostate and empties into the urethra.

The two spermatic cords are composed of the ductus deferens, and the vessels and nerves of the testicles. They are covered by a thin membrane. Each cord originates at the tail of the epididymis and extends back through the inguinal canal.

The prostate gland lies below the rectum and above the pelvic bone along the lower abdominal wall. It is normally located near the front of the rim of the pelvis at the back of the abdominal cavity. The prostate gland surrounds the neck of the bladder, the beginning portion of the urethra, and the termination of the ductus deferens.

The penis is located within the prepuce (a protective tubular sheath of skin). When the penis is not erect it is completely enclosed within the prepuce, which is attached to the lower outside abdominal wall.

The urethra is a hollow tube that extends from the urinary bladder to the very tip of the penis. It travels through the prostate, and carries urine from the bladder to the outside.

What Is the General Structure of the Canine Male Reproductive Tract?

The scrotum is a pouch divided by a thin wall into two cavities, each of which is occupied by a testicle, an epididymis, and the tail end of the spermatic cord. The skin of the scrotum is covered with fine hairs. The dartos of the scrotum is a layer of tissue that lies just under the skin and is made up of muscle and other tissue. Under the dartos is connective tissue and a shiny tissue that lines the scrotum.

Each testicle is oval in shape and thicker in the middle than from side to side. The testicles contain seminiferous tubules that manufacture sperm. Special cells near the seminiferous tubules, called Sertoli cells, support and supply nutrition to the sperm cells.

The epididymis is comparatively large in the dog and consists of an elongated structure composed of a long convoluted or twisted tube. It begins at the front end of the testicle and is positioned along the edge of the testicle.

The deferent ducts are thin muscular tubes that are made up of three layers of muscle.

The prostate gland surrounds the neck (thin part) of the bladder, as well as the end of the ductus deferens. A thin wall divides the gland into two equal-sized smooth, firm lobes. The prostate has multiple openings into the urethra.

The penis is a highly vascularized structure. It is composed of several parts, including the root, body and distal portion or glans penis. The root and body are made up of a spongy type tissue and a bone called the os penis. The glans penis is the soft portion of the penis. During copulation, the glans penis swells and causes the penis to become locked in the vagina of the female. The penis also surrounds the termination of the urethra and is important in directing the stream of urine to the outside of the body.

The prepuce is the tubular sheet of skin that covers the free part of the non-erect penis.

<

Pg 1 of 3

>
Share