What Is the Average Greyhound Lifespan?

Pet owners love greyhounds because of their quiet, even-tempered demeanor. These wonderful dogs have a very long lifespan, considering their size, and they tend to enjoy good health for most of their lives.

If you’re wondering about the greyhound lifespan, you’ll be glad to know that they live fairly long lives. The average greyhound lifespan is about 10 to 13 years. That makes the greyhound one of the longest-lived big dogs. Some greyhounds have lived as long as 15 years, but this is not the norm.

To help you better understand why the greyhound lifespan is as long as it is, read on to learn more about the history of the greyhound breed and to find out how you can help your dog live as long as possible.

History of the Greyhound Breed

With cave drawings and Egyptian artifacts portraying the greyhound as far back as 8.000 years ago, the greyhound is among the oldest of all dog breeds. In England, greyhounds have long been associated with royalty. You’ll find this noble dog is the subject of many paintings and you’ll find him in English literature throughout the centuries.

This ancient breed probably originated in Egypt, and greyhounds have been prized dogs throughout history. Greyhound-like drawings appear on the walls of Egyptian tombs dating from 2200 BC. The Egyptians treasured these hounds, and their birth and death were recorded as if they were members of the family. Here’s an interesting fact – greyhounds were often mummified and buried with their owners for the trip to the afterlife.

This breed was greatly admired by many different cultures, and greyhounds are the only dog breed to be mentioned in the Bible.

Cleopatra, Queen Elizabeth I of England, President Rutherford B. Hayes and General Custer were all greyhound owners.

The origin of the name “greyhound” is a subject of much debate. Some believe that greyhounds used to be only gray in color. Others believe the name is Old English. That’s because “grei” means “dog” and “hundr” means “hunter.” This argument is strengthened by the fact that greyhounds did originate as hunting dogs. Another possibility is that the name is derived from “gre” or “gradus”, which would mean “first rank among dogs.” Finally, some believe that the name greyhound originated from “Greekhound” since the breed first arrived in England from the Greeks.

The greyhound is the quintessential hunter. Greyhounds were bred to hunt prey for thousands of years and they are the fastest of all dog breeds. Greyhounds can sprint at speeds of up to 40 or 45 miles an hour.

Today, greyhounds are bred for racing but they are becoming increasingly popular as family pets. They are not territorial and they seldom bark. Greyhounds are graceful and quiet dogs that are incredibly loving. Greyhounds love to be petted and rubbed and they enjoy the loving company of their human families. They make excellent house dogs because they are quiet, clean and very low key.

About the Greyhound Lifespan

Why does the greyhound have an average lifespan of about 10 to 13 years? Many factors contribute to the long greyhound lifespan. Even though these dogs are racers, they are known to be quite lazy. This is a low maintenance dog with low exercise demands, which means they have minimal stress in their lives. Combine that low stress with a hereditary lack of major genetic health problems that are often found in other breeds and you’ll get a dog that is quite healthy.

While the greyhound is a generally healthy dog, there are a number of medical conditions that can affect him. These conditions include:

  • An abnormal response to anesthesia
  • Bloat
  • Bone cancer (osteosarcoma)
  • Minor heart murmurs

As long as they live in a calm, happy home where they are fed a healthy diet and given the daily exercise they require, they should live long, happy lives. Even the retired race dogs have the same long life expectancy.

To make sure that your greyhound lives a long, healthy life, feed him a healthy diet and make sure that he gets enough exercise. A greyhound doesn’t require much daily exercise – a nice long daily walk should be all he needs to stay healthy and happy.

The retired racing greyhound also lives a long life and makes a great pet for adoption. According to the New Jersey Greyhound Adoption Program, Inc., most greyhounds are retired from their athletic activities by the time they are 2 to 5 years of age. To learn more about retired racing greyhounds go to our article Greyhounds Get a Second Chance.

How Fast Can a Greyhound Run?

Have you ever wondered, “How fast can a greyhound run?”

The greyhound has a sleek, aerodynamic build with a narrow head and long legs, and the greyhound is perfectly constructed for high-speed pursuit. Greyhounds can sprint at speeds up to 40 or 45 miles per hour, making them the fastest of all dog breeds. A greyhound can sustain his top running speed for about 250 meters (about 273 yards).

The greyhound’s running style and gait are what allow him to run so fast. Greyhounds run using a rotary gallop style – a style that lends itself to sprinting. In this running style, the order of the legs hitting the ground rotates – first the front left leg touches the ground, then the front right leg, then the rear right leg and finally the rear left leg.

Like the cheetah, the greyhound uses a two stage gait. In the first stage, the body and legs are stretched out parallel to the ground. In the second stage, the body is compressed with front and rear legs overlapping beneath the greyhound. This is when the legs propel off the ground to push forward with speed.

How Fast Can a Greyhound Run Compared to Other Animals?

So how fast can a greyhound run compared to other animals? The quickest animal in the world is the cheetah. Cheetahs are known to run up to 70 miles an hour at top speed, but the cheetah can only sustain that top speed for about 200 meters (about 219 yards).

So now that we’ve answered the question, “How fast can a greyhound run?”, let’s look at a different question: Which is faster, a greyhound or a racehorse? This question was addressed at a race track in the United Kingdom where officials raced a top greyhound against a top thoroughbred racehorse over a 400 meter (437 yards) grass course. The greyhound won the race by seven horse lengths. The greyhound’s jackrabbit start was the key to its success. However, the thoroughbred horse was steadily gaining on the greyhound throughout the race, and had the course been longer, the horse would have overtaken the greyhound. Greyhounds are known for their sprinting, not their endurance.

Greyhounds were originally bred as hunting dogs to chase prey such as rabbits, foxes and deer. Because of their great speed, greyhounds have made a name for themselves as racing dogs and they are still used for that purpose to this day. However, the sport is coming under fire by many. To learn more, go to our article Greyhound Racing Comes Under Fire.

How Much Exercise Does a Greyhound Need?

Contrary to popular belief, a greyhound does not need a lot of exercise. Two twenty minute walks a day is usually enough exercise to keep your greyhound happy and healthy.

A greyhound will happily spend most of its time indoors relaxing and laying around. Greyhounds need to burn off their conserved energy with a run or walk. Backyard exercise is perfectly acceptable for a greyhound, but daily walks provide more mental and physical stimulation for your greyhound – and these walks help to build a better relationship between you and your dog.

According to the National Greyhound Adoption Program, how much outdoor exercise your greyhound will need depends in large part upon the size of his indoor living space. If you live in an apartment or small house with no back yard, your greyhound will need about 2 to 3 short walks per day, or 1 to 2 long walks. A good run in a completely enclosed fenced area will also be enjoyable for your greyhound.

The age and physical condition of your greyhound will also determine the type of activity you can engage him in. For instance, a senior greyhound may not be as eager to join in a hearty romp with other dogs but he would enjoy a nice quiet walk with you.

Remember that greyhounds are sprinters, not distance runners. So before you run long distances with your dog, start slowly with a one-mile jog and slowly work your way up from there. If your dog is not conditioned for it, a long run can be detrimental to your greyhound’s health.

Make sure to monitor your greyhound for signs of fatigue or overheating whether you are running or walking. Always carry a bottle of water in case your dog gets overheated. Never walk your dog in the heat. Early morning and evening walks are the best times to walk your dog during the warm weather. Remember, if the sidewalk is too hot for you to walk barefoot, it is too hot for your dog to walk on.

What Is the Greyhound Temperament?

What is the greyhound temperament? Greyhounds usually have a wonderful temperament. They are friendly and non-aggressive, although some greyhounds can be a bit aloof with strangers.

The greyhound temperament is quizzical, sometimes shy, sensitive, quiet and very gentle. Greyhounds are very smart dogs. They possess superior intellect and can exhibit surprising independence.

Like all dogs, greyhounds should be socialized at an early age. That means that they should be exposed to many different people, places, and situations. This will help to ensure that your greyhound grows up to be a well-rounded dog. When greyhounds are not properly socialized, they can become timid and they can have difficulty adapting to changes in their environment or their schedule. So take the time to properly socialize your greyhound.

These quiet, gentle, affectionate dogs can fit into almost any lifestyle, from a small condo in the city to the largest country home.

What Is the Greyhound Temperament Like?

The greyhound temperament is a good fit with almost any household. They are not territorial dogs and they seldom bark. Greyhounds are graceful and quiet dogs that are incredibly loving. Greyhounds love to be petted and rubbed and they enjoy the loving company of their human families. They make excellent house dogs because they are quiet, clean and very low key.

Because of his great speed, the lazy nature of a greyhound may surprise you. His favorite pastime is sleeping on a soft couch or bed. Greyhounds have a very low energy level, which is surprising considering their great speed. Greyhounds need and enjoy a daily leash walk, and because of their ability to run, a greyhound may become a great jogging companion. But don’t worry about being able to give this ex-racer enough exercise. Greyhounds are very happy with a daily walk, and that’s all the exercise they require. And as he gets older, your greyhound may even need to be coaxed into taking that daily walk.

Greyhounds have a very strong prey drive. The urge to chase small animals is so strong that it will likely prevail regardless of any training to the contrary. Greyhounds will bolt off after small animals like rabbits, cats and squirrels. That’s why it is so important never to let a greyhound off-leash in an unfenced area.

The greyhound is a big dog that can weigh anywhere from 60 to 75 pounds or more, but his gentle, quiet nature and his somewhat lazy disposition make him seem like more of a giant cat than a dog.

How Are Greyhounds with Children and Pets?

Greyhounds are mellow dogs who do well around children. Greyhounds are known to be patient with children, but they do best in homes with older children who know how to behave around dogs. A greyhound is more likely to walk away from a teasing child than to snap at him. As with all breeds, you should always teach your children how to approach and touch your greyhound and to supervise any interactions they may have. Teach your children to never approach a dog while he is sleeping or eating, or to try to take the dog’s food away.

Greyhounds usually do very well with other dogs, however, they may view smaller dogs, cats, and small pets as prey – especially if these animals run from them. Some greyhounds have a higher prey drive than others and in some cases, instinct can win out overtraining. In some cases, greyhounds have been known to injure or even kill smaller pets. And while your greyhound may be good friends with your cat, he may still see outdoor cats as fair game for hunting.

Temperament of the Track Greyhound

Track greyhounds have always been around other greyhounds, but other dog breeds. So other dog breeds and cats are foreign to them. A track greyhound has never seen another type of dog or a cat before. They recognize other greyhounds but they may be perplexed or frightened by other dog breeds – or, in some cases, they will simply ignore them. In some instances, track greyhounds can be a bit unpredictable with other dogs and cats, so if you’ve got other pets make sure that you discuss your home situation fully with the greyhound adoption group and make sure to choose a suitable dog for your home.

Because of their previous racing careers, track greyhounds are very used to being crated and transported, and they are used to spending time around strangers. The greyhound breed is rarely nervous or fearful.

You must remember that some track greyhounds have never been alone, so they may suffer from separation anxiety when their owners are away. For this reason, you may want to consider adopting two greyhounds instead of one.

What You Should Know About Owning a Greyhound

Have you ever wondered about owning a greyhound? Greyhounds make great pets, and they are suitable for any type of home including an apartment or condo.

Greyhounds have a very strong prey drive. If you have a yard, you will need a solid fence to keep your greyhound from chasing animals they might identify as prey, including rabbits, squirrels and cats. Because of its strong prey drive, a greyhound should never be allowed to run off leash except in a securely fenced area. If your greyhound were to take off after a small animal, you’d have a tough time catching him because of his ability to run so fast. Greyhounds are the fastest dog breed and they can run at speeds up to 40 to 45 miles an hour.

To learn more about greyhounds, read our article Breed of the Month: Why We Love Greyhounds. 

Although you may be drawn to an adorable greyhound puppy, you should also consider greyhound adoption. When their racing days are over, many retired racing greyhounds are abandoned, euthanized or sold to laboratories. But if they are adopted, these adult greyhounds can easily adapt to home life and give you many years of great companionship.

Adopting Greyhounds

The majority of greyhound pets in America are former racing dogs. You may be surprised to find out that there are actually more ex-racing dogs in homes than there are still on the track. There are approximately 120,000 Greyhounds living as pets in U.S. homes while only 55,000 greyhounds still race on the track.

Although there are a small amount of greyhounds bred for racing, there are very few non-racing greyhounds bred in the United States. Most families interested in owning a greyhound will adopt a retired racetrack dog because there are so many ex-racers in need of good homes.

What Are Greyhounds Like?

Here’s a fun fact about greyhounds. While they are known for their speed, the greyhound’s favorite pastime is actually sleeping. The truth is, they love to cuddle up on a soft couch, chair or bed and enjoy a nice nap. This is not a destructive dog. Greyhounds are very docile and quiet with a low indoor energy level.

The disposition of greyhounds is very loving and affectionate. Usually, the affection they feel for their family will also extend to strangers, but greyhounds can be aloof with some strangers.

Like all dogs, greyhounds should be socialized at an early age. That means your greyhound should be exposed to many different people, places, and situations. This will help to ensure that your greyhound grows up to be a well-rounded dog. When greyhounds are not properly socialized, they can become timid and they can have difficulty adapting to changes in their environment or their schedule. So take the time to properly socialize your greyhound.

Even though they are fast runners, the greyhound is a fairly low energy dog. Greyhounds require (and enjoy) a daily walk to help keep them from becoming bored. But keep your greyhound on a leash during a walk to prevent him from taking off after small animals.

Whether you buy your dog as a puppy or adopt him as an adult, you should begin training your greyhound as soon as you get him home. Greyhounds can have a stubborn streak and they are very independent. So you need to be confident and consistent in your training methods. Just remember that this is a sensitive breed, so you will do better with patience and training methods that use rewards rather than punishment. Treats work great as a training reward.

It is a common practice to muzzle greyhounds, especially if they had been working as race dogs. Greyhounds will nip at other dogs and can hurt smaller dogs and animals when their prey drive takes over. Rescues often recommend muzzling adopted greyhounds until they get settled into their new home. Then you should have a better idea of their temperament.

Taking Care of Greyhounds

Greyhounds have a short, smooth coat that is very easy to care for. It is also a very thin hair coat, which means your greyhound can get the shivers in cold or wet weather. Greyhounds have no fat layer on their bodies to keep them warm in the rain or cold weather. If you live in colder climates, you should have a warm coat for your greyhound to wear in the rain and snow. Also remember that the greyhound’s thin coat leaves him vulnerable to scrapes and nicks. A greyhound can be any color including black, fawn, red, blue, gray or white. Their coats can also be various shades of brindle.

All About Greyhounds

Originally, greyhounds were bred as hunting dogs. Their job was to chase foxes, deer and rabbits. Greyhounds are also the fastest of the dog breeds, running up to 40 to 45 miles an hour. Because of their great speed, they have made a name for themselves as racing dogs and are still used as racing dogs today.

Greyhounds stand about 2 feet, 1 inch to 2 feet, 6 inches tall at the shoulder and weigh between 60 and 75 pounds. The greyhound has a sleek, aerodynamic build with a narrow head and long legs.

Greyhounds make great pets. In addition to their grace and speed, people love greyhounds for their sweet and mild nature. They have a friendly nature toward people and other dogs. Greyhounds are loyal and affectionate to their family. The greyhound is not aggressive towards strangers, but he will let you know that someone is approaching your home.

Intelligent and independent, the greyhound can be considered “cat like” in many ways. Greyhounds do have a sensitive side and will react to any tension in the home. With mistreatment, the greyhound can become shy or timid in nature.

This ancient breed probably originated in Egypt, and greyhounds have been prized dogs throughout history. This breed has won the admiration of many different cultures, and greyhounds are the only dog breed to be mentioned in the Bible.

Cleopatra, Queen Elizabeth I of England, President Rutherford B. Hayes and General Custer were all greyhound owners.

The greyhound was one of the first breeds to appear in American dog shows. It was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1885. The first official coursing race took place the next year. In 1906, the National Coursing Association was founded in the United States. Greyhound racing became very popular and in many states it remains popular until this very day. It is, however, a very controversial sport because so many retired racing greyhounds are abandoned, euthanized or sold to laboratories.

To learn more about the greyhound, go to our article Choosing a Greyhound.

What You Should Know About Owning a Greyhound

Have you ever wondered about owning a greyhound? Greyhounds make great pets, and they are suitable for any type of home including an apartment or condo.

Here’s a fun fact about greyhounds. While they are known for their speed, the greyhound’s favorite pastime is actually sleeping. The truth is, they love to cuddle up on a soft couch, chair or bed and enjoy a nice nap. The greyhound is not a destructive dog. Greyhounds are very docile and quiet with a low indoor energy level.

The disposition of greyhounds is very loving and affectionate. Usually the affection they feel for their family will also extend to strangers, but greyhounds can be aloof with some strangers.

Even though they are fast runners, the greyhound is a fairly low energy dog. Greyhounds require (and enjoy) a daily walk to help keep them from becoming bored. But keep your greyhound on a leash during a walk to prevent him from taking off after small animals.

Whether you buy your dog as a puppy or adopt him as an adult, you should begin training your greyhound as soon as you get him home. Greyhounds can have a stubborn streak and they are very independent. So you need to be confident and consistent in your training methods. Just remember that this is a sensitive breed, so you will do better with patience and training methods that use rewards rather than punishment. Treats work great as a training reward.

Greyhounds have a short, smooth coat that is very easy to care for. It is also a very thin hair coat, which means your greyhound can get the shivers in cold or wet weather. If you live in colder climates, you should have a warm coat for your greyhound to wear in the rain and snow. Also remember that the greyhound’s thin coat leaves him vulnerable to scrapes and nicks. A greyhound can be any color including black, fawn, red, blue, gray or white. Their coats can also be various shades of brindle.

Greyhounds are low to average shedders, depending on the various times of year. A greyhound requires only minimal grooming.

To learn more about owning a greyhound, go to What You Should Know About Owning a Greyhound.

What Is the Greyhound Temperament?

Greyhounds usually have a wonderful temperament. They are friendly and non-aggressive, although some greyhounds can be a bit aloof with strangers.

The greyhound temperament is a good fit with almost any household. They are not territorial dogs and they are not prone to barking. Greyhounds are graceful and quiet dogs that are incredibly loving. Greyhounds love to be petted and rubbed, and they enjoy the loving company of their human families. They make excellent house dogs because they are quiet, clean and very low key.

Meet the Newest AKC Dog Breed — the Azawakh!

The American Kennel Club (AKC) has officially announced that the Azawakh breed is now fully recognized by the AKC.

Of course, you may have already heard of the Azawakh (pronounced OZ-a-wok), and you might even own one! The Azawakh isn’t a new breed per se — but up until January 2019, they weren’t recognized by the AKC as an official breed. What this means is that the Azawakh breed wasn’t allowed to compete in certain dog show competitions. Before this year, the Azawakh was allowed to compete in some competitions but was not eligible for every single one of the 22,000+ events that the AKC sponsors every year. Here’s a timeline of how the Azawakh rose to its official status:

  • January 1, 2008: The Azawakh is able to compete in Companion Events
  • January 1, 2008: The Azawakh is able to compete in AKC Lure Coursing Events for Suffix Titles
  • June 30, 2011: The Azawakh is eligible to compete in the AKC Miscellaneous Class
  • January 1, 2019: The Azawakh is accepted into the AKC Stud Book
  • January 1, 2019: The Azawakh is assigned the Hound Group designation

The Azawakh is the 193rd breed accepted onto the AKC roster, and they’ll be eligible to compete in the Westminster Kennel Show in 2020.

So, why wasn’t the Azawakh recognized before? There are more than 400 dog breeds in the world, but not all of them are recognized by the AKC. If there are too few of the breed in the United States, or the owners don’t have a significant interest in having the breed receive official registered status, they typically won’t be recognized officially. However, they can end up on other club registrations depending on the restrictions that exist within each organization.

What is the Azawakh Temperament?

If you’re not familiar with the Azawakh, these dogs are lean, tall, and elegant. Often confused for a Greyhound or Whippet, Azawakhs tend to be loyal dogs. They’re independent and deeply affectionate and would make a great companion or guardian for your family.

Where Did the Azawakh Come From?

Azawakhs are sighthounds originating from West Africa. Their long and lean bodies come from their ancestors’ ability to hunt prey swiftly through the desert. These hounds have a thousand-year history, and although they look gentle, these are durable dogs whose ancestors had keen sight and speed to hunt prey in the Sahara.

What Do Azawakhs Look Like?

Azawakhs can have a variety of colors and markings including red, clear sand to fawn, brindled, parti-color, blue, black, and brown. They may also have black or white markings on their legs. Azawakhs are also tall and have long legs that give them the ability to run far and fast. Because these dogs are so lean, it’s not uncommon to be able to see their bone structure and musculature through their skin. To the untrained eye, these dogs might look underfed or malnourished, but this is actually how they should look! The average Azawakh weighs 35-55 pounds, which also aids in their ability to run fast. Similar to Greyhounds and Whippets, they’ll need a warm coat if you’re heading out for a walk in colder weather.

You can learn more about the Azawakh breed by checking out our profile on them here.

What Are the Cutest Dog Breeds?

Here’s Where We Rank Some of the Most Adorable Canines

Every dog is cute, and puppies are even cuter — but how do you rank which one is the cutest? Pointy ears or droopy? Fluffy fur or spots? With more than 150 dog breeds out there and many more that aren’t officially recognized by the AKC or the Kennel Club, it’s a tough decision to make.

We put together a list of what we think are the top cutest dog breeds, and if you’re looking to pick your next best friend based on how cute they are, this list can help! Or if you want to see if your dog made the cut, take a look to see who we chose — if yours is missing, give us a shout in the comments and let us know why they deserve to be one of the cutest.

Golden Retriever

Often pictured as the American dream family dog, the Golden Retriever is a classic when it comes to cute dog breeds. From their puppy stages to adulthood, these friendly dogs are great for families and their adorable faces are difficult to resist. These dogs are as loving as they are smart, and their playful nature makes a great addition to any home.

Dachshund

The wiener dog is often found on people’s favorite dog breed lists. These long dogs come in a variety of colors and hair types, but for what they lack in size they make up for in personality. Dachshunds are quick to become a true forever friend. Whether you have a standard size or miniature, these dogs are stubborn but playful.

Pomeranian

These tiny, fluffy dogs are loved by many and are actually descended from large sled dogs! They typically weigh under 10 pounds, and their small size makes them great for people living in the city or apartments. Pomeranians are social balls of fluff that are known for their intelligent and active personality.

Greyhound

These dogs are often thought of as an oxymoron. As one of the fastest dog breeds, they’re also one of the laziest. Greyhounds can reach a top speed of 45 mph — when they want to. Most of them just prefer to sleep, and on average they’ll snooze for 12 hours a day. These dogs are known for being loving and gentle, and they’ve seen a resurgence in popularity since people have started adopting retired racing greyhounds.

Shiba Inu

Loved in popular culture and families alike, the Shiba Inu is an adorable breed. These loyal dogs are native to Japan, and their fox-like appearance and their soft fur land them on our cutest breeds list. Often referred to as a fiery ball of fur, Shiba Inus are stubborn and independent but are sure to liven up your household.

Goldendoodle

A cross between the popular Golden Retriever and the Poodle, the Goldendoodle is an energetic and friendly dog that’s great for families. Their outgoing nature and intelligent personality also makes them easy to train. Goldendoodles have curly fur and their similarity to teddy bears when they’re puppies has made them a standout as a cute breed.

Corgi

Another dog breed that has risen to fame in popular culture is the Corgi. These cute and funny dogs are loved for their short and stout bodies and fluffy butts. Corgis are known for being bold and outgoing, and their unique behavior is often amusing for bystanders.

Australian Shepherd

The unique colors of an Australian Shepherd’s fur are eye-catching enough to put this breed on the list, but we love how lovable and soft these small herding dogs are most. Contrary to their name, these dogs actually originated on ranches in the Western United States, and have since spread into regular homes due to their affectionate and good-natured temperament.

American Eskimo

These white, fluffy snowballs are unique and lovable dogs that make great companions. American Eskimos are pretty even-tempered and love just about everyone, which makes them perfect for families, young couples, or singles alike. These pups are also smart and easy to train which makes them perfect for someone searching for man’s best friend.

Bichon Frise

These curly-haired cotton balls are made for a cutest dog breeds list, and along with their feisty personality, the Bichon Frise is a cheerful, small breed that’s very affectionate. You’ve probably seen a Bichon Frise on the big screen at least once, as these pups are easy to train and are big fans of the spotlight. If you’re looking for an outgoing dog, the Bichon Frise might be your new best friend.

Common Pit Bull Health Problems

In general, the pit bull usually lives for about 11 to 13 years. The breed is generally healthy, especially when they are fed a healthy diet, but they can have certain pit bull health problems.

If you’re thinking of getting a pit bull, you’ll want to consider pit bull health problems. All dogs can develop genetic health problems. It’s the same with people – you have the potential to inherit a particular disease or condition. But just because the dog has the potential to develop these genetic health problems, that doesn’t mean that he necessarily will.

The American Pit Bull Terrier can develop genetic health problems that include hip dysplasia, hypothyroidism, allergies and demodectic mange. Make sure the breeder can provide documentation from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) or the University of Pennsylvania (PennHip) that both of your puppy’s parents have hips that were rated in good condition. The breeder should also provide an OFA health certification for thyroid.

The American Staffordshire Terrier can develop genetic health problems that include hip dysplasia, hypothyroidism, allergies, demodectic mange, cerebellar ataxia and heart disease. Before you buy an American Staffordshire Terrier, make sure that the breeders can provide documentation from OFA or PennHip that both of your puppy’s parents have hips that were rated in good condition. The breeder should also provide an OFA evaluation by a board-certified veterinary cardiologist, an OFA thyroid evaluation from an approved laboratory and an OptiGen DNA test for cerebellar ataxia.

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier can develop genetic health problems that include hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, patellar luxation, juvenile cataracts, and allergies. These dogs can also suffer from a metabolic disorder known as L-2-Hydroxyglutaric Aciduria. Before you buy a Staffordshire Bull Terrier, make sure that the breeders can provide documentation from OFA or PennHip that both of your puppy’s parents have hips that were rated in good condition. The breeder should also provide you with the Canine Eye Registration Foundation (CERF) documentation that shows their breeding dogs have had their eyes tested and are free from inherited juvenile cataracts. As for L-2-Hydroxyglutaric Aciduria, there is a DNA test that tells breeders if a dog is a carrier of this condition. Do not buy a dog from a breeder that cannot provide written documentation that the parents do not have this condition.

Hip dysplasia is one of the most common skeletal diseases seen in dogs. It is a hereditary defect of the joint between the hip and hind legs. Dogs with hip dysplasia may experience pain or discomfort and have an uneven gait. They may display difficulty or reluctance in rising, jumping, running and climbing. Sometimes this condition is treated with surgery and it is managed through proper weight management. To learn more about hip dysplasia, go to Hip Dysplasia in Dogs.

The pit bull is also prone to heart disease. This includes aortic stenosis (narrowing of the left ventricle and the aorta), irregular heart rhythm or a heart murmur. Your veterinarian can diagnose an irregular heartbeat or a heart murmur by listening to your dog’s heart. If the condition is more severe, your pit bull may require further testing including an echocardiogram or a chest x-ray. Treatment for this condition includes diet control and medication. Check out this recipe for homemade dog food for dogs with heart disease.

It’s good to be aware of these pit bull health problems. Many of these conditions are not detectable in a puppy and it can be hard to determine whether the puppy will have these health problems or not. That’s why you must find a reputable breeder and you must ask for independent certification that the dog’s parents have been screened for these pit bull health problems. If a breeder tells you that their dogs don’t need health certifications for any reason, do not buy your puppy from this breeder.

To learn more about pit bulls, go to All About Pit Bull Breeds.

Should You Take in a Pit Bull Rescue?

Should you take in a pit bull rescue? Or is it dangerous to adopt a pit bull that has an unknown history and parentage?

Adopting a pit bull with an unknown history can be a risk, but each dog should be judged on its own merits by his current personality and behavior. While it is true that many pit bull rescues of unknown heritage have been horribly abused, neglected or forced to fight, they still love people more than anything and they can still become loving family pets. Responsible rescues and dog shelters will evaluate dog behavior before putting the dog up for adoption and offer only those pit bulls that display the proper temperament toward humans for adoption.

Some may think that it is better to adopt a pit bull puppy instead of an adult pit bull. But since the adult dogs are already grown up, their personality has already developed and you can see whether your pit bull is dominant or submissive with people and whether he has aggression to other dogs. Dog aggression is a trait that does not develop in some dogs until they are fully mature. So it is possible that the cute little puppy that you adopt who is friendly with all other dogs may not like dogs at all later in life. That includes dogs that they have grown up with and lived with their entire life.

Both environment and genetics play a role in determining a dog’s mature personality. This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t adopt that cute pit bull puppy. Just make sure that you are willing to keep your dog if he becomes dog intolerant or dog aggressive as he gets older. But if you want to know how your dog will ultimately act around humans and other animals, there’s something to be said about adopting an adult dog. With an adult dog, what you see in their personality and temperament is what you get. It doesn’t matter what the history was. It’s an easier decision to make because you can see whether the dog is going to be a good match for the family.

Before you take in a pit bull rescue you should understand the federal, state and local laws pertaining to pit bulls. Before you adopt, make sure that pit bull type dogs are not banned in your area. Make sure that your homeowner’s association allows you to own a pit bull. Also, make sure that your homeowner’s or rental insurance policy does not prohibit you from owning a pit bull. And before you adopt, make sure that you are willing to deal with the stigma that many people believe about pit bulls.

How to Know If a Dog Is Right for You

When looking for the right dog for your family, it’s important to make the perfect match. First, consider the dog’s activity level. If you’re a person who loves to be active, then a more active dog will be a great match for you. But if you’re more of a couch potato, you should choose a dog with a mellower personality.

In addition to asking about how active the dog is, find out if the dog is affectionate. Ask questions about the dog’s personality. That way you’ll get a better match.

If you have young children, an adult dog may be a better choice than a puppy. Raising children and a puppy at the same time can be overwhelming. If you have kids, bring them to the shelter to meet the dog and see how the dog reacts around your children. If your children are overly energetic, look for an energetic dog.

If you have other pets, that can be a problem with a pit bull. Known for their animal aggression, many pit bulls have trouble interacting with other dogs. And cats are considered prey by pit bulls. So make sure that the dog gets along with your current pets through careful introductions in a controlled environment.

To learn more about pit bulls, go to All About Pit Bull Breeds.

What Are the Different Types of Pit Bulls?

When you say the term “pit bull,” most people believe that it refers to a single breed of dog. But there are actually several types of pit bulls. The three most common types of pit bulls are the American Pit Bull Terrier, the American Staffordshire Terrier, and the Staffordshire Bull Terrier.

Here are some facts about these three different types of pit bulls.

American Pit Bull Terrier

The American Pit Bull Terrier typically weighs between 30 to 60 pounds and stands 17 to 21 inches high. This dog’s coat is short and smooth. The coat can be a variety of colors including red, brown, black, fawn, brindle and white.

The American Pit Bull Terrier is very muscular. This powerful dog can be a challenge to walk on a leash if not properly trained. The head of the American Pit Bull Terrier is proportionate to the rest of his body.

At one time the American Pit Bull Terrier was an iconic breed. They were used in advertising, and they were American military mascots. But once dog fighters began to exploit the breed, their reputation changed.

The American Pit Bull Terrier has a reputation for being aggressive because of his history as a fighting dog. But with the right people who understand his personality, the pit bull can be a good family companion. A pit bull requires a lot of love. With a loving owner and the right socialization, training, and love, the American Pit Bull Terrier can be a docile and affectionate family pet.

This breed is loyal and obedient but needs a firm owner so he will understand who is in control. The American Pit Bull Terrier is a pushy dog who will walk all over you if you let him. To begin training your puppy early on. If you wait until he is older to begin training you will be dealing with a headstrong dog.

The American Pit Bull Terrier is an active, athletic, intelligent, playful and confident dog who is typically very friendly to people. Because of this, even pit bulls from bad backgrounds can go on to be loving family pets with the right training and socialization.

This athletic dog can be a good partner for bicycling or jogging. The breed also enjoys swimming and retrieving.

Pit Bulls are known for digging, pulling and chewing – destructive behaviors that you will have to deal with as an owner. Give your American Pit Bull Terrier plenty of chew toys and a place where he is allowed to dig in the yard. And keep your prized belongings out of reach to protect them.

There is much misinformation about this breed, and there are also campaigns to outlaw the breed. In many cities, like Denver, pit bulls may be prohibited, and sometimes it is not easy to get a homeowner’s insurance policy if you own a pit bull. So check local ordinances carefully to make sure it is legal to own an American Pit Bull Terrier in your community.

One of the misconceptions about American Pit Bull Terriers is that they are vicious guard dogs. But while they may look intimidating, most of these dogs are friendly. Still, they are strong, determined and smart dogs – and they are not known for backing down.

While the American Pit Bull Terrier is drawn to people, it does not necessarily like other dogs, especially those of the same sex. They also tend to see cats as prey unless they are raised with them from a very young age.

There are many celebrities who own American Pit Bull Terriers including Jessica Alba, Jessica Biel, Alicia Silverstone, Rachael Ray and Jon Stewart.

American Staffordshire Terrier

The American Staffordshire Terrier is closely related to the American Pit Bull Terrier. The American Staffordshire Terrier is the larger of the two breeds, but they have a similar personality and activity level.

The American Staffordshire Terrier typically weighs between 50 and 60 pounds and stands about 17 to 19 inches high. This dog’s coat is thick but short and can be found in a variety of colors and patterns. The dog’s body is muscular with a square build.

Although he may look intimidating, when it comes to people this breed is more of a lover than a fighter. This breed is very friendly and devoted to its owner. Despite his formidable appearance, the American Staffordshire Terrier is a dog who loves people. With the right owners and the right socialization, training, and love, he can be a docile, trustworthy and affectionate family dog. This dog loves to be the center of attention and will often follow you around from room to room.