What to Do if Your Dog Eats Trazodone® Medication?

Dealing with Canine Ingestion of Trazodone®

Dogs commonly eat things they shouldn’t, especially the stray tablet or capsule from the medicine cabinet that may ultimately fall on the floor. According to the Pet Poison Helpline, almost half of their calls are about pets ingesting human medications such as Trazodone. Many of these drugs can be toxic due to a dog’s smaller size and differences in human and canine metabolism and toxicities.

Today, we’ll look at what happens to your dog if it accidentally ingests Trazodone®, and what you should do.

What is Trazodone®?

Oleptro, Desyrel®, Desyrel Dividose, also known by the generic name “Trazodone”, is a drug commonly used for the treatment of human depression, anxiety disorders, and insomnia. Other uses in humans include the treatment of obsessive-compulsive symptoms, post-traumatic stress disorders, panic disorders, control of nightmares, fibromyalgia, alcohol and cocaine withdrawal, migraine prevention, schizophrenia and erectile dysfunction.  Trazodone was extremely popular as an antidepressant in the 1980’s and 1990’s but is less commonly used due to the common side effect of sedation associated with Trazodone.

Trazodone is categorized as a serotonin antagonist reuptake inhibitor (SARI). It works by altering chemicals (serotonin) in the brain that may become unbalanced.

Trazodone is available as both brand name and generic formulations. Common tablets sizes include 50mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, and 300 mg.

Is Trazodone® Routinely Prescribed to Dogs?

Trazodone® is prescribed to dogs and cats for a variety of behavioral problems including aggression, fears, anxieties, urine marking and compulsive disorders. For more information on the therapeutic use of Trazodone in dogs and cats, go to the pet drug library: Using Trazodone in Dogs.

The therapeutic dose used in dogs is as follows:

  • In dogs, there is a range of doses. A lower dose is generally started and gradually tapered up to minimize side effects. The dosage range goes from approximately 2.5 mg per pound per day to 15 mg per pound per day. The average dose is approximately 3.5 mg per pound per day. Lower doses are used when combined with other behavioral modification medications.
  • Currently, trazodone is not widely used in cats but appears to be safe and well tolerated.  Doses generally used are 50 mg to 100 mg per cat for anxiety.

What to Do if Your Dog Eats Trazodone®

In general, Trazodone® is considered toxic to dogs if enough drug is ingested. The toxicity depends on the amount ingested relative to your dog’s body weight.

The most common side effects include agitation, aggression, incoordination, excessive drooling, panting, hyperactivity, vocalization such as barking or howling, tremors, seizures, vomiting, diarrhea, dilated pupils and/or sedation. Some dogs will experience elevated blood pressure, heart rates and body temperature.

The amount of drug that can cause problems in a dog varies with each individual dog. Some depression and sedation have been documented when a dog ingests 3 mg of Trazodone per pound of body weight. Most dogs will experience neurologic abnormalities including drooling, trouble walking, incoordination, tremors and seizures at higher doses. Neurologic side effects can be more severe in dogs with a history of seizures or epilepsy. Doses over 250 mg per pound can be fatal. Some dogs can be much more sensitive to Trazodone than other dogs and lower doses can cause severe side effects in death in some dogs.

If your dog ingests Trazodone®, call your veterinarian for recommendations. Some veterinarians may recommend that you induce vomiting in your dog if toxic doses were ingested within the past few hours. For more information, go to How to Make a Dog Vomit.  For Trazodone® the best time to induce vomiting to prevent drug absorption is within 15 minutes of ingestion. Induction of vomiting is NOT recommended if your dog is showing any neurological abnormalities.

Monitor your dog carefully and ensure they are behaving normally. Monitor for tremors, seizures, sedation, hyperactivity, trouble walking, vomiting, or lack of appetite.

When Should YOU Call Your Veterinarian?

Call your vet immediately if your dog ingests Trazodone® and get his or her advice.

Call your vet if you see any abnormalities or concerns with your dog. If you notice vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, pale gums, difficulty breathing, lack of appetite, tremors, seizures, hyperactivity, trouble walking or any other signs, call your veterinarian as soon as possible.

How is Trazodone® Toxicity in Dogs Treated?

There is no specific antidote for Trazodone toxicity in dogs. Treatment will be determined on the amount your dog ate, size of your dog, concurrent medical problems, when the toxic dose was ingested, and symptoms your dog is displaying. If your dog ingests Trazodone®, call your veterinarian for recommendations.

Grapiprant (Galliprant®) for Dogs

Grapiprant, most commonly known by the brand name Galliprant®, is an anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug commonly used in dogs. It belongs to the class of drugs known as a first-in-class piprant; a non-COX-inhibiting prostaglandin receptor antagonist (PRA).

  • Galliprant works by blocking the specific receptor, the EP4 receptor, the main mediator of osteoarthritis pain and inflammation in dogs.
  • Galliprant is commonly compared to or used as an alternative to the class of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Drugs in this class include Celebrex®, ibuprofen, carprofen (Rimadyl®), Deracoxib (Deramaxx®), aspirin and naproxen. Drugs in this class are associated with side effects relative to kidney and liver function and therefore Galliprant is commonly used as a safer alternative in some dogs with underlying liver or kidney disease that require pain management.
  • Galliprant® is a prescription drug and can only be obtained from a veterinarian or by prescription from a veterinarian.

Brand Names and Other Names of Deracoxib

  •   This drug is registered for use in animals only.
  •   Human formulations: None
  •   Veterinary formulations: Galliprant® (Elanco)

 

Uses of Deracoxib for Dogs

  • Galliprant® is indicated for the control of pain and inflammation associated with orthopedic pain from osteoarthritis in dogs.
  • Galliprant® can also be used for chronic pain management.

Precautions and Side Effects

  • While generally safe and effective when prescribed by a veterinarian, Galliprant® can cause side effects in some animals. The most common side effects are decreased appetite, vomiting, soft mucoid stools, and/or diarrhea. Please contact your veterinarian if you see these signs in your dog while giving Galliprant®.
  • Galliprant® should not be used in dogs with known hypersensitivity or allergy to the drug or other drugs in this class.  Signs of an allergic reaction to Galliprant® may include hives, itchy skin and/or facial swelling.
  • Galliprant® is not approved for use in dogs over under month of age under 8 pounds in weight, or dogs used for breeding, pregnant or nursing.
  • Since Galliprant® has not been tested in cats, it should not be used in this species.
  • Galliprant® may interact with other medications. Consult with your veterinarian to determine if other drugs your pet is receiving could interact with Galliprant®.  Do not give Galliprant® with drugs such as aspirin, corticosteroids such as prednisone, and other NSAID drugs such as meloxicam or carprofen.

How Galliprant® is Supplied

  •   Galliprant® is available as 20 mg, 60 mg, and 100 mg tablets.
  •   Bottle sizes include 7, 30 and 90 count.

Dosing Information of Galliprant® for Dogs

  • Medication should never be administered without first consulting your veterinarian.
  • The typical dose administered to dogs for control of pain associated with arthritis is 0.5 to 1 mg per pound (1 to 2 mg/kg) every 24 hours orally as needed.
  • Galliprant® may be administered with or without food.
  • Half tablet increments may be prescribed.
  • It is recommended to use the lowest dose to provide pain control.
  • The duration of administration depends on the condition being treated, response to the medication and the development of any adverse effects. Be certain to complete the prescription unless specifically directed by your veterinarian. Even if your pet feels better, the entire treatment plan should be completed to prevent relapse.

We hope this gives you more information about the drug Galliprant®. For additional information or to report an adverse drug reaction, please contact the FDA at 1-888-FDA-VETS.

Resources & References:

  •      ASPCA Pet Poison Hotline.
  •      Current Veterinary Therapy XV, Bonagura and Twedt.
  •      Pet Poison Helpline.
  •      Plumb’s Veterinary Handbook by Donald C. Plumb, 9th Edition.
  •      Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Ettinger & Felman.

Can You Give Your Pet This? Here Are Human Meds That Are Vet Approved

There are thousands of drugs on the market for humans and animals. Drug categories include antibiotics, chemotherapy, anti-inflammatory, acid-reducing stomach medications, allergy medications, pain medications, anti-anxiety, anti-nausea, anti-vomiting, and many more.

Many medications used to treat dogs and cats are human medications. However, it is important to know that some human drugs can be given to pets safely and other drugs are very unsafe. In fact, some commonly used human drugs are extremely toxic. One example of an unsafe medication is acetaminophen, also known by the trade name Tylenol®.  Acetaminophen is a human medication used to reduce pain, fever, and symptoms associated with the cold or flu. Small amounts of acetaminophen are toxic to cats and can cause severe illness and possibly death.

On the other hand, there are human drugs that are safe to use in pets. In fact, many human drugs are exactly the same as the pet drug. Numerous pet prescriptions are filled at human pharmacies including heart medications, anti-depressants, and antibiotics just to name a few.  There are also many over-the-counter (OTC) medications that can be safely used in dogs and cats that don’t require a prescription including famotidine (Pepcid), cimetidine (Tagamet), Diphenhydramine (Benadryl), and Cetirizine (Zantac).

Below we will give you information about four human medications that are vet approved and tell you how they can be used safely in dogs and cats.

All About Famotidine for Dogs and Cats

Famotidine, commonly known by the brand name Pepcid®, is a histamine H2 receptor antagonist that decreases the production of acid in the stomach. It has been used in human medication since the late 1970’s.  The most common use is to treat heartburn and ulcerations in both humans and dogs.

Famotidine is commonly used in human medications and veterinary medicine due to its improved mechanism of action and length of action as compared to other drugs in its class.  Famotidine has largely replaced previous histamine H2 receptor antagonist generation drugs, such as Cimetidine. We will discuss more on Cimetidine below.

Famotidine is available in both injectable and oral tablets in multiple sizes. Common oral sizes include 10 mg, 20 mg, and 40 mg. The larger milligram sizes are prescription but the 10 mg size is a common over-the-counter size that can be found in most pharmacies.

There are minimal risks associated with Famotidine although there are drug interactions with digoxin and ketoconazole.

Learn more about how to dose and use Famotidine safely in dogs and in cats.

The typical dose of Famotidine given to dogs is 0.25 mg to 0.5 mg per pound orally every twelve to twenty-four hours.  Common doses of Famotidine in dogs and cats include:

  •   A 20-pound dog would need 5 to 10 mg per dose every 12 to 24 hours.
  •   A 50-pound dog would require a dose of 12.5 mg to 25 mg total dose every 12 to 24 hours.
  •   A 10-pound cat would require 2.5 to 5 mg as a total dose every 12 to 24 hours.

Since the most common OTC size of famotidine is 10 mg. As you can see above the dose can vary from ¼ pill in small dogs and cats to 2 ½ pills in large dogs.

All About Cimetidine for Dogs and Cats

Cimetidine, commonly known by the brand name Tagamet® among others, is a histamine H2 receptor antagonist that decreases the production of acid in the stomach. It has been used in human medication since the late 1970’s.

Cimetidine is less commonly used today in human medications and veterinary medicine due to the development of new and better drugs in the class of histamine H2 receptor antagonist. Cimetidine has effects on the cytochrome P450 enzyme system which can lead to various drug interactions. Such drug interactions include certain antacids, metoclopramide, sucralfate, diazepam, and digoxin.

The newer drugs have fewer drug interactions with longer activity. Newer generation drugs in this class include Famotidine (also known as Pepcid® and discussed above) and Ranitidine (also known as Zantac®).

However, Cimetidine is still used and available and can be used in a pinch if you have a dog with nausea and/or vomiting.  Cimetidine is available in both injectable and oral tablet sizes including 100 mg, 150 mg, 200 mg, and 300 mg.

The risks associated with Cimetidine mostly evolves around its interaction with other drugs. If your dog or cat is on other medications, it is better to choose and give a newer generation histamine H2 receptor antagonist such as famotidine (Pepcid®) discussed above that does not have those same possible adverse effects from drug interactions.

Dexmedetomidine Oromucosal Gel (Sileo®) for Dogs

Use of Sileo® in Dogs

  • Dexmedetomidine Oromucosal Gel, commonly known by the brand name Sileo®, is used in a dog with behavioral problems and anxiety related issues and specifically to noise aversion. The name is pronounced /si-lehh-o/. It’s a Latin word that means to “be silent.”
  • Common noise aversion triggers include fireworks, thunder, construction work, traffic or street noise, celebrations, vacuum cleaners, and smoke detectors.
  • Sileo® is the only FDA-approved treatment for canine noise aversion.
  • Behavioral disorders in dogs are common causes for veterinary visits and behavioral problems are also a frequent reason for euthanasia of pets, especially when unacceptable or dangerous animal behavior is involved.
  • Sileo® is a potent and selective alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist. It binds with the alpha-2 receptors in the locus coeruleus, preventing a release of norepinephrine and reducing levels of norepinephrine. Reduced levels of norepinephrine reduce the levels of anxiety and fear.
  • The goal of Sileo® is to calm but not sedate the dog.
  • Sileo® is absorbed through the mucous membranes in the mouth.
  • Sileo® is a prescription drug and can only be obtained from a veterinarian or by prescription from a veterinarian.
  • This drug is approved for use in animals by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Brand Names and Other Names of Dexmedetomidine Oromucosal Gel

  • This drug is registered for use in humans only.
  • Human formulations: None
  • Veterinary formulations: Sileo® (Zoetis Animal Health)

Uses of Sileo® in Dogs

  • Sileo® is used for calming in dogs specific to behavior modification of dogs. Sileo® may be used for various anxiety problems and is specifically targeted for noise phobias (such as fear of fireworks). Read more about Thunder and Fear Induced Dog Anxiety.

Precautions and Side Effects of Sileo®

  • While generally safe and effective when prescribed by a veterinarian, Sileo® can cause side effects in some animals.
  • Sileo® should not be used in animals with known hypersensitivity or allergy to dexmedetomidine or to any of the excipients.
  • Sileo® should be used with caution in dogs with a history of severe cardiovascular disease, liver or kidney diseases, respiratory, or in conditions of shock, or severe debilitation.
  • Sileo® has not been approved for use in dogs under the age of 16 weeks or breeding, nursing, or lactating dogs.
  • Sileo® may interact with other medications. Consult with your veterinarian to determine if other drugs your pet is receiving could interact with Sileo®.
  • Side effects associated with Sileo® include lethargy, sedation, and vomiting.
  • Handlers should use gloves when handing Sileo® to avoid direct exposure of SILEO to their skin, eyes or mouth.
  • Overdoses of Sileo® can occur from failure to lock the ring-stop on the syringe before dosing. Overdoses should be promptly treated by your veterinarian.

How Sileo Is Supplied

Sileo is available in a preloaded in a multidose oral syringe.

Dosing Information for Sileo® in dogs

  • Medication should never be administered without first consulting your veterinarian.
  • SILEO is formulated as a gel that is absorbed into your dog’s body when you apply it to the mucous membranes between your dog’s cheek and gums. Sileo should not be swallowed. With each dose, SILEO is absorbed into the tissues of the mouth through mucous membranes. It should not be swallowed. If your dog swallows SILEO, allow at least 2 hours before applying the next dose.

Below – we cover how to dose followed by when to dose your dog with Sileo®.

  •  A dosing chart on the box is by body weight and associated number of dots on the prefilled syringe.  Carefully follow your veterinarian’s instructions on the dosing and the information on the box.
  •  See this link to view videos on how to administer Sileo. It is important to dose this drug correctly to avoid the risk of overdose.
  • Additional dosing recommendations include:
  • A dose greater than 6 dots should be divided between both sides of the mouth to maximize absorption through the mucous membranes.
  • Avoiding food and treats 15 minutes after dosing minimizes the risk of your dog swallowing any part of the dose.
  • Ideally, this syringe should be used within two weeks.
  • Warnings:
    • Use gloves when administering.
    • Do not handle Sileo® if you are pregnant.
    • Sileo is sensitive to light so please store inside the box.
    • Call your veterinarian immediately if you accidentally overdose your dog.

The first dose can be given:

  •  Approximately 30–60 minutes before the noise event.
  •  As soon as your dog shows signs of anxiety or fear related to noise.
  •  Whenever you hear a noise that causes your dog to be fearful or anxious.
  •  If your dog swallows SILEO, allow at least 2 hours before applying the next dose.

Additional doses can be given:

  • It takes about 30 minutes to 1 hour for SILEO to take full effect, and it typically lasts 2 to 3 hours. If the noise continues and the behavioral changes recur, further doses can be given at intervals of 2 hours, up to a total of five times during each noise event, as needed.
  • Do not give another dose of SILEO if your dog appears sedated from the previous dose.
  • Do not give more than 5 doses per event.

The duration of administration depends on the condition being treated, response to the medication and the development of any adverse effects. Be certain to complete the prescription unless specifically directed by your veterinarian. Even if your pet feels better, the entire treatment plan should be completed.

Probiotic Culturelle for Dogs and Cats

Overview of Culturelle

  • Culturelle is a probiotic medication recommended for dogs and cats with diarrhea, constipation, or excessive “gas”.
  • Probiotics are substances that stimulate the growth of beneficial microorganisms in the intestinal flora. They generally consist of live bacteria and yeasts which can help restore the good bacteria and reestablish the right balance of intestinal flora. There are many types of probiotics and one that is commonly used in dogs and cats is called “Culturelle”. Learn more about probiotics and prebiotics.
  • Culturelle® products contain Lactobacillus Rhamnosus Gg (LGG®) probiotic, which is a single-strain super probiotic that has proven effectiveness for immune health and digestion support.
  • Quality control studies by some veterinarians support that Culturelle is superior in quality standards and efficacy over other similar probiotics on the market for dogs and cats. The Culture Probiotics Digestive Health products each contain 10 billion active cultures.
  • Culturelle is available over the counter but should not be administered unless under the supervision and guidance of a veterinarian.

Brand Names and Other Names for Culturelle

  • Human adult formulations: Culturelle Probiotics Digestive Health capsule, Culturelle Probiotics Digestive Health orange chewable, Culturelle Probiotics Digestive Health extra strength capsule, Culturelle Probiotics Pro-Well capsule, Culturelle Probiotics Pro-Well 3 in 1 complete, Culturelle Probiotics Pro-Well Immune + Energy, Culturelle Probiotics Pro-Well Health & Wellness.
  • Human kid formulations: Culturelle Probiotics Kids Packets, Culturelle Probiotics Kids Chewables, Culturelle Probiotics Kids with Fiber Packets.
  • Human baby formulations:  Culturelle Baby Calm + Comfort drops, Culturelle Baby Grow + Thrive drops, Culturelle Baby Grow + Thrive packets.
  • Veterinary formulations: None

Uses of Culturelle for Dogs and Cats

Precautions and Side Effects

  • While generally safe and effective when prescribed by a veterinarian, Culturelle can cause side effects in some animals.
  • Culturelle should not be used in animals with known hypersensitivity or allergy to the drug or pets.
  • If your dog is showing signs of restlessness, large abdomen, nonproductive vomiting, please see your vet as soon as possible. These symptoms could be caused by a potentially life-threatening condition called Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus (Bloat).
  • The safety of Culturelle use in pets pregnant or lactating has not been established however it is considered safe for use by many veterinarians.
  • Culturelle is commonly used with other medications including antibiotics and those for nausea and/or diarrhea.
  • Consult with your veterinarian to determine if other drugs your pet is receiving could interact with Culturelle. Please discuss use if your pet is on a restricted or limited ingredient diet.

How Culturelle is Supplied

  • Culturelle is a human over-the-counter product available in capsules, sachet’s (little packets like sweeter), liquid, and as a powdered drink supplement.

Dosing Information of Culturelle for Dogs and Cats

  • Medication, even over the counter medication such as Culturelle, should never be administered without first consulting your veterinarian.
  • The capsule or sachet products are most commonly recommended for use in dogs and cats. The chewable products and kids/baby products may contain xylitol which can be toxic to dogs. However, based on information from the manufacturer, the chewable tablets contain less than 0.1 mg amount of xylitol per tablet.
  • In dogs, the dose of Culturelle recommended for diarrhea ranges from ½ capsule total dose for small dogs and 1 capsule total dose for large dog every 12 to 24 hours.
  • The dose of the sachet packet is 1/10 of a packet per 10 pounds of body weight every 12 to 24 hours sprinkled on the food.
    • A 25-pound dog would get ¼ of a packet every 12 to 24 hours
    • A 50-pound dog would get ½ packet every 12 to 24 hours
    • A 100-pound dog would get 1 packet every 12 to 24 hours
  • In cats, 1/10 of a packet per 10 pounds of body weight or ½ capsule every 12 to 24 hours. You can sprinkle this on the food.
  • The duration of administration depends on the condition being treated, response to the medication and the development of any adverse effects. Be certain to complete the prescription unless specifically directed by your veterinarian. Even if your pet feels better, the entire treatment plan should be completed to prevent relapse or prevent the development of resistance.
  • Can be stored at room temperature. Keep away from light and moisture.

Resources & References:

  • ASPCA Pet Poison Hotline
  • Current Veterinary Therapy XV, Bonagura, and Twedt
  • Diagnosis and Management of Protein-Losing Enteropathies in Dogs and Cats Part I. Atlantic Coast Veterinary Conference 2014. Jennifer E. Stokes, DVM, DACVIM (SA Internal Medicine). Clinical Associate Professor, Veterinary Medical Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA.
  • Nutraceuticals in Dermatology. North American Veterinary Dermatology Forum 2006. Susan G. Wynn, DVM. Bell’s Ferry Veterinary Hospital, Acworth GA.
  • Pet Poison Helpline
  • Plumb’s Veterinary Handbook by Donald C. Plumb, 8th Edition
  • Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Ettinger & Felman
  • When More Is Needed: Nutraceuticals. Pacific Veterinary Conference 2015. Joe Bartges, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DACVN. Cornell University Veterinary Specialists, Stamford, CT, USA.
  • www.culturelle.com

What to Do if Your Dog Eats Crestor (Rosuvastatin) Medication?

Dogs commonly eat things they shouldn’t, especially the stray tablet or capsule from the medicine cabinet. According to the Pet Poison Helpline, almost half of their calls are about pets ingesting human medications such as Crestor® (Rosuvastatin). Many of these drugs can be toxic due to of a dog’s smaller size and differences in human and canine metabolism and toxicities.

What is Crestor® (Rosuvastatin)?

Crestor®, also known by the generic name “Rosuvastatin”, is a drug commonly used in humans to lower cholesterol levels and referred to in a group of cholesterol lowering medications called “statins”. It is currently one of the most prescribed drugs in the United States.

Crestor works by blocking an enzyme in the liver causing the liver to produce less cholesterol. In addition, Crestor helps the liver breakdown of cholesterol already in the blood.

Is Crestor Routinely Prescribed to Dogs?

Crestor is not prescribed in veterinary medicine.

What to Do if Your Dog Eats Crestor

In general, Crestor is not considered highly toxic to dogs. The exception is if a small dog ingests several pills. The most common side effects seen in dogs after ingestion of Crestor is vomiting, diarrhea and “gas”. Most side effects occur from long-term and recurrent use and not from a one-time dose.

Monitor your dog carefully and ensure they are behaving normally. Monitor for normal urinations, bowel movements, vomiting, or lack of appetite.

When Should YOU Call Your Vet?

Call your vet if you see any abnormalities or concerns with your dog. If you notice vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, pale gums, difficulty breathing, lack of appetite, trouble walking or any other signs, call your veterinarian as soon as possible.

 

How to Prevent Exposure

Dogs are so good at getting into things, and it’s easier to prevent a problem than it is to resolve it.

  • Store all medications out of the reach of pets. For example, some pets get on tables or can knock things over on coffee or end tables so avoid these area. Many pet owners store their medications on counters, tables and night tables.
  • Take extra special care with pill bottles and weekly pill holders. The shape of the containers and the sounds they make when shaken can mimic toys, tempting some dogs into playing with and chewing on them.
  • Weekly pill holders are especially dangerous because they open easily and expose dogs to a multitude of medications.
  • Avoid using plastic bags to store pills; if you are taking medications to work or otherwise traveling, keep them in your purse or pocket. Bags can be easily chewed through and ingested.
  • Purses are a hazard because we commonly carry our human medications in our purses. Make sure you close your purse, hang up or secure in an area inaccessible to your pet.
  • Encourage house guests to keep their luggage closed and medications secure from your pets. This may include keeping access closed to guest areas.
  • Help visitors secure their belongings out of the reach of pets. Ensure visitor’s purses are closed and out of reach.

Other Emergency Plans

If your dog ingests Crestor and you can’t get in touch with your vet, call your closest emergency clinic. Another option is to call a poison control hotline for pets. The two most common are:

  • Pet Poison Helpline, 855-764-7661(http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com). A $49 per incident fee applies.
  • ASPCA Pet Poison Hotline, (888) 426-4435 (https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control). A $65 consultation fee applies.

Sources:

  • Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Ettinger & Felman
  • Current Veterinary Therapy XV, Bonagura and Twedt
  • ASPCA Pet Poison Hotline
  • Pet Poison Helpline
  • Plumb’s Veterinary Drug Handbook, 8th Edition

 

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What to Do if Your Dog Eats Nexium (Esomeprazole) Medication?

Dogs commonly eat things they shouldn't, especially the stray tablet or capsule from the medicine cabinet. According to the Pet Poison Helpline, almost half of their calls are about pets ingesting human medications such as Nexium® (Esomeprazole). Many of these drugs can be toxic due to of a dog's smaller size and differences in human and canine metabolism and toxicities.

What is Nexium® (Esomeprazole)?

Nexium®, also known by the generic name “esomeprazole”, is a drug commonly used in humans to treat excessive stomach acid secretion, esophagitis, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It is currently one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the United States.

Is Nexium Routinely Prescribed to Dogs?

Nexium can be used in dogs but is not routinely prescribed in veterinary medicine.

What to Do if Your Dog Eats Nexium

In general, Nexium is not considered highly toxic to dogs. The exception is if a small dog ingests many pills. The most common side effects seen in dogs after ingestion of Nexium is vomiting, diarrhea and “gas”.

Monitor your dog carefully and ensure they are behaving normally. Monitor for normal urinations, bowel movements, vomiting, or lack of appetite.

When Should YOU Call Your Vet?

Call your vet if you see any abnormalities or concerns with your dog. If you notice vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, pale gums, difficulty breathing, lack of appetite, trouble walking or any other signs, call your veterinarian as soon as possible.


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How to Prevent Exposure

Dogs are so good at getting into things, and it's easier to prevent a problem than it is to resolve it.

  • Store all medications out of the reach of pets. For example, some pets get on tables or can knock things over on coffee or end tables so avoid these area. Many pet owners store their medications on counters, tables and night tables.
  • Take extra special care with pill bottles and weekly pill holders. The shape of the containers and the sounds they make when shaken can mimic toys, tempting some dogs into playing with and chewing on them.
  • Weekly pill holders are especially dangerous because they open easily and expose dogs to a multitude of medications.
  • Avoid using plastic bags to store pills; if you are taking medications to work or otherwise traveling, keep them in your purse or pocket. Bags can be easily chewed through and ingested.
  • Purses are a hazard because we commonly carry our human medications in our purses. Make sure you close your purse, hang up or secure in an area inaccessible to your pet.
  • Encourage house guests to keep their luggage closed and medications secure from your pets. This may include keeping access closed to guest areas.
  • Help visitors secure their belongings out of the reach of pets. Ensure visitor's purses are closed and out of reach.

Other Emergency Plans

If your dog ingests Nexium and you can't get in touch with your vet, call your closest emergency clinic. Another option is to call a poison control hotline for pets. The two most common are:

  • Pet Poison Helpline, 855-764-7661(http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com). A $49 per incident fee applies.
  • ASPCA Pet Poison Hotline, (888) 426-4435 (https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control). A $65 consultation fee applies.

Sources:

  • Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Ettinger & Felman.
  • Current Veterinary Therapy XV, Bonagura and Twedt.
  • ASPCA Pet Poison Hotline
  • Pet Poison Helpline
  • Plumb's Veterinary Drug Handbook, 8th Edition


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What to Do if Your Dog Eats Zocor (Simvastatin) Medication?

Dogs commonly eat things they shouldn't, especially the stray tablet or capsule from the medicine cabinet such as Zocor® (Simvastatin). According to the Pet Poison Helpline, almost half of their calls are about pets ingesting human medications. Many of these drugs can be toxic due to of a dog's smaller size and differences in human and canine metabolism and toxicities.

What is Zocor (Simvastatin)?

Zocor®, also known by the generic name “Simvastatin”, is a drug commonly used in humans to lower cholesterol levels and referred to in a group of cholesterol lowering medications called “statins”. It is currently one of the most prescribed drugs in the United States.

Zocor® lowers cholesterol and triglyceride levels that may reduce the risk of blood vessel problems, heart attack and stroke.

Is Zocor® Routinely Prescribed to Dogs?

Zocor is not prescribed in veterinary medicine.

What to Do if Your Dog Eats Zocor

In general, Zocor is not considered highly toxic to dogs. The exception is if a small dog ingests many pills. The most common side effects noted in dogs after ingestion of Zocor is vomiting, diarrhea and severe “gas”. Most side effects occur from long-term and recurrent use and not from a one-time dose.

Monitor your dog carefully and ensure they are behaving normally. Monitor for normal urinations, bowel movements, vomiting, or lack of appetite.

When Should YOU Call Your Vet?

Call your vet if you see any abnormalities or concerns with your dog. If you notice vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, pale gums, difficulty breathing, lack of appetite, trouble walking or any other signs, call your veterinarian as soon as possible.


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How to Prevent Exposure

Dogs are so good at getting into things, and it's easier to prevent a problem than it is to resolve it.

  • Store all medications out of the reach of pets. For example, some pets get on tables or can knock things over on coffee or end tables so avoid these area. Many pet owners store their medications on counters, tables and night tables.
  • Take extra special care with pill bottles and weekly pill holders. The shape of the containers and the sounds they make when shaken can mimic toys, tempting some dogs into playing with and chewing on them.
  • Weekly pill holders are especially dangerous because they open easily and expose dogs to a multitude of medications.
  • Avoid using plastic bags to store pills; if you are taking medications to work or otherwise traveling, keep them in your purse or pocket. Bags can be easily chewed through and ingested.
  • Purses are a hazard because we commonly carry our human mediations in our purses. Make sure you close your purse, hang up or secure in an area inaccessible to your pet.
  • Encourage houseguests to keep their luggage closed and medications secure from your pets. This may include keeping access closed to guest areas.
  • Help visitors secure their belongings out of the reach of pets. Ensure visitor's purses are closed and out of reach.

Other Emergency Plans

If your dog ingests Zocor and you can't get in touch with your vet, call your closest emergency clinic. Another option is to call a poison control hotline for pets. The two most common are:

  • Pet Poison Helpline, 855-764-7661(http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com). A $49 per incident fee applies.
  • ASPCA Pet Poison Hotline, (888) 426-4435 (https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control). A $65 consultation fee applies.

Sources:

  • Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Ettinger & Felman
  • Current Veterinary Therapy XV, Bonagura and Twedt
  • ASPCA Pet Poison Hotline
  • Pet Poison Helpline
  • Plumb's Veterinary Drug Handbook, 8th Edition.


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What to Do if Your Dog Eats Zantac (Ranitidine) Medication?

Dogs commonly eat things they shouldn't, especially the stray tablet or capsule from the medicine cabinet. According to the Pet Poison Helpline, almost half of their calls are about pets ingesting human medications such as Zantac®. Many of these drugs can be toxic due to of a dog's smaller size and differences in human and canine metabolism and toxicities.

What is Zantac (Ranitidine)?

Zantac, also known by the generic name “Ranitidine”, is a drug commonly used in humans to treat excessive stomach acid secretion, esophagitis, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It is currently one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the United States and is available as both a prescription drug and as an over-the counter drug.

Is Zantac Routinely Prescribed to Dogs?

Zantac is commonly prescribed to both dogs and cats. Zantac is in a class of drugs referred to as “H2 blockers” and related to medications such as cimetidine (Tagamet) and famotidine (Pepcid).

Zantac is prescribed to treat dogs with stomach ulcers, esophagitis, gastric reflux and esophageal reflex.The therapeutic dose in dogs is 0.5 to 1 mg per pound of body weight (1 to 2 mg per kilogram of body weight) every 8 to 12 hours.

Ranitidine is available in multiple sizes including 75 mg, 150 mg 300 mg and an oral suspension in 15 mg/ml.

What to Do if Your Dog Eats Zantac

In general, Zantac is not considered highly toxic to canines. Generally toxicity is only a concern if large amounts are ingested (i.e. many pills in a small dog). The most common side effects seen in dogs after ingestion of Zantac include vomiting, diarrhea, and restlessness. Higher dosages can cause muscle tremors and elevated respiratory rates.

Limited data is availability about toxicity of Zantac in dogs and cats. Monitor your dog carefully and ensure they are behaving normally. Monitor for normal urinations, bowel movements, vomiting, or lack of appetite.

When Should YOU Call Your Vet?

Call your vet if you are concerned about your dog ingesting a toxic dose of medication and if you see any abnormalities or concerns with your dog. If you notice vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, pale gums, difficulty breathing, lack of appetite, trouble walking or any other signs, call your veterinarian as soon as possible.


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How to Prevent Exposure

Dogs are so good at getting into things, and it's easier to prevent a problem than it is to resolve it.

  • Store all medications out of the reach of pets. For example, some pets get on tables or can knock things over on coffee or end tables so avoid these area. Many pet owners store their medications on counters, tables and night tables.
  • Take extra special care with pill bottles and weekly pill holders. The shape of the containers and the sounds they make when shaken can mimic toys, tempting some dogs into playing with and chewing on them.
  • Weekly pill holders are especially dangerous because they open easily and expose dogs to a multitude of medications.
  • Avoid using plastic bags to store pills; if you are taking medications to work or otherwise traveling, keep them in your purse or pocket. Bags can be easily chewed through and ingested.
  • Purses are a hazard because we commonly carry our human medications in our purses. Make sure you close your purse, hang up or secure in an area inaccessible to your pet.
  • Encourage house guests to keep their luggage closed and medications secure from your pets. This may include keeping access closed to guest areas.
  • Help visitors secure their belongings out of the reach of pets. Ensure visitor's purses are closed and out of reach.

Other Emergency Plans

If your dog ingests Zantac and you can't get in touch with your vet, call your closest emergency clinic. Another option is to call a poison control hotline for pets. The two most common are:

  • Pet Poison Helpline, 855-764-7661(http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com). A $49 per incident fee applies.
  • ASPCA Pet Poison Hotline, (888) 426-4435 (https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control). A $65 consultation fee applies.

Sources:

  • Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Ettinger & Felman
  • Current Veterinary Therapy XV, Bonagura and Twedt
  • ASPCA Pet Poison Hotline
  • Pet Poison Helpline
  • Plumb's Veterinary Drug Handbook, 8th Edition

What to Do if Your Dog Eats Lipitor (Atorvastatin) Medication?

Dogs commonly eat things they shouldn't, especially the stray tablet or capsule from the medicine cabinet including drugs such as Lipitor (Atorvastatin).
According to the Pet Poison Helpline, almost half of their calls are about pets ingesting human medications. Many of these drugs can be toxic due to of a dog's smaller size and differences in human and canine metabolism and toxicities.

What is Lipitor?

Lipitor, also known by the generic name “atorvastatin”, is a drug commonly used in humans to lower cholesterol levels. It is currently one of the most prescribed drugs in the United States.

Is Lipitor Routinely Prescribed to Dogs?

Lipitor is not prescribed in veterinary medicine.

What to Do if Your Dog Eats Lipitor

In general, Lipitor is not considered highly toxic to dogs. The exception is if a small dog ingests many pills. The most common side effects seen in dogs after ingestion of Lipitor are vomiting, diarrhea and “gas”.

Monitor your dog carefully and ensure they are behaving normally. Monitor for normal urinations, bowel movements, vomiting, or lack of appetite.

When Should YOU Call Your Vet?

Call your vet if you see any abnormalities or concerns with your dog. If you notice vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, pale gums, difficulty breathing, lack of appetite, trouble walking or any other signs, call your veterinarian as soon as possible.


(?)

How to Prevent Exposure

Dogs are so good at getting into things, and it's easier to prevent a problem than it is to resolve it.

  • Store all medications out of the reach of pets. For example, some pets get on tables or can knock things over on coffee or end tables so avoid these area. Many pet owners store their medications on counters, tables and night tables.
  • Take extra special care with pill bottles and weekly pill holders. The shape of the containers and the sounds they make when shaken can mimic toys, tempting some dogs into playing with and chewing on them.
  • Weekly pill holders are especially dangerous because they open easily and expose dogs to a multitude of medications.
  • Avoid using plastic bags to store pills; if you are taking medications to work or otherwise traveling, keep them in your purse or pocket. Bags can be easily chewed through and ingested.
  • Purses are a hazard because we commonly carry our human medications in our purses. Make sure you close your purse, hang up or secure in an area inaccessible to your pet.
  • Encourage house guests to keep their luggage closed and medications secure from your pets. This may include keeping access closed to guest areas.
  • Help visitors secure their belongings out of the reach of pets. Ensure visitor's purses are closed and out of reach.

Other Emergency Plans

If your dog ingests Lipitor and you can't get in touch with your vet, call your closest emergency clinic. Another option is to call a poison control hotline for pets. The two most common are:

  • Pet Poison Helpline, 855-764-7661(http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com). A $49 per incident fee applies.
  • ASPCA Pet Poison Hotline, (888) 426-4435 (https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control). A $65 consultation fee applies.

Sources:

  • Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Ettinger & Felman.
  • Current Veterinary Therapy XV, Bonagura and Twedt.
  • ASPCA Pet Poison Hotline
  • Pet Poison Helpline
  • Plumb's Veterinary Drug Handbook, 8th Edition.


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