Why People Are Looking for Rehoming for Dogs

Sometimes, through circumstances beyond your control, you may have to think about rehoming your dog. The good news is that there are people out there who are looking for rehoming for dogs.

Many people who are thinking of adding a new dog to their family think that rehoming is definitely the way to go. They would rather find a dog that has been living in a good home. The dog has been well taken care of and it is already trained.

If you’re thinking of getting a rehomed dog, just be sure that you know what you’re getting into. Find out as much as you can about the dog. Find out why the current owner is rehoming the dog. Ask for the dog’s veterinary records. Does the dog have any medical conditions or special needs? Find out if he is good with children or other household pets. Get as much information about the dog as you can before you make up your mind.

Rehoming is different than adoption or rescuing. With rehoming, it is up to you to make sure that the dog has been spayed or neutered, and that all vaccinations are up to date. Always ask the dog owner these questions to make sure the dog is ready for your home.

Rehoming Your Dog

When you have to give up your dog to a new home it’s never easy. But you may be forced to give up your pet for reasons beyond your control. You might have financial problems that prevent you from properly caring for your dog. You may be facing foreclosure. You may have found that you have a pet allergy. There can be any number of good reasons that it is no longer possible for you to care for your dog, and your primary objective is to find him a good home.

When searching for a good home for your dog, always start with your inner circle. Speak to family, friends, neighbors and coworkers. One of them may be willing to take your dog and give him a good home. Talk to everyone you know about rehoming your dog. Sometimes word of mouth goes a long way toward finding a new home for your beloved pet.

Speak to your veterinarian. He or she may know of someone who would be willing to take your dog. Speak to the breeder, person or rescue organization you got your dog from – they may be able to help you rehome your dog.

If you have no luck finding a new home for your dog this way, it’s time to broaden the search. You just have to make the right connections. Ask your veterinarian to post flyers in the office. Talk to local shelters and see if they can help match your dog to a potential new owner. They may have a bulletin board or a newsletter where you can advertise.

Use your social media to reach out to others. Post your dog’s photo or a great video. Tell your dog’s story and ask your connections to share the information on their social streams. Look for adoption websites where you can advertise and ask your local shelter if they have a website where you can post your dog’s information.

Make flyers and put them up in high traffic areas. Post them at the grocery store, the office, at school, at church, and in veterinary offices.

Good advertising makes it easier to connect with a new potential owner. Always remember to list your contact information. Have a good photo of your dog. Make sure to describe your dog and all of the wonderful things that make him so special. The better you describe your dog the easier it will be for potential new owners to get to know him. Let them know that the dog is spayed or neutered and tell them that your dog’s vaccinations are up to date. It is always best to have all vaccinations up to date before trying to rehome your dog.

Rehoming Your Dog to Strangers

If you find that you have to give your dog to someone that you don’t really know, you may be worried. The questions just keep going through your mind. Will my dog go to a good home? Will they take care of him? Will he be happy there?

When you are rehoming your dog to someone that you don’t know, it’s good to take precautions. Ask the right questions before placing the dog. You can ask the potential new owners to fill out an application and you can also ask them to show you their home. Find out if there will be children or other household pets in the home. It’s important to make the best possible match for your dog.

Everything You Need to Know About Cat Hairballs

Cat hairballs can be disgusting and shocking — especially if you’ve never seen your cat experience one before. For your cat, hairballs feel just as bad as they look, so helping your kitty prevent them and understanding how to deal with them can make a huge difference.

The first time you see your cat hurl a hairball, you might be pretty worried. He’ll retch and hack and try to bring it up. Then it will be there — on your rug or some other conspicuous spot — in all its undigested glory.

Your cat may look distressed during all of this, but it’s really nothing serious. A hairball, or trichobezoar, is just what the name says it is: a wad of undigested wet hair within the digestive tract. Generally, trichobezoars are not ball-shaped; they are sausage-shaped and are formed when the cat swallows too much hair after grooming.

As the cat licks his fur, dead hair comes loose. Because the cat’s tongue has a rough surface made up of backward-slanting papillae, most of the hair cannot be dislodged, and the cat cannot spit it out. So he swallows it. Most of the hair goes through the digestive tract with no problem and is excreted in the feces; however, sometimes too much hair is ingested and the wad can’t pass through properly. Instead, it accumulates in the stomach and forms a wadded mass.

Helping Your Cat

When your cat brings up a hairball, you might hear a sound like a dry cough, or as if your cat has something stuck in the back of her throat. It also may be preceded by fluid or food. Your cat might also experience constipation while her body is dealing with the hairball.

There are several things you can do to help your cat when she has a hairball. From preventing it to helping her pass it, cat hairballs can be a much less stressful experience if you know what you’re dealing with.

The first and most important thing you can do is groom your cat. Frequent grooming is the best way to prevent cat hairballs, because you’ll be doing most of the work and your cat will be ingesting less stray hairs. The more hair your cat has, the more grooming you’re going to have to do. It’s not out of the question to groom your cat once a day in order to keep her from developing hairballs. A daily brushing is also good to keep your cat’s skin healthy and free of any tangles or mats that have developed in her fur.

Treating Cat Hairballs

There are several things you can do to treat hairballs:

  • Frequent grooming. Again, grooming your cat frequently can reduce the amount of hair your kitty ingests.

  • Hairball products. You can use petroleum-based products that act as a laxative and lubricant to help your cat pass a hairball. These products, which are pleasant tasting to cats, can be fed in paste form or applied to your cat’s paws to allow your pet to lick it off.

  • Hairball remedy treats. You can also give your cat treats that contain mineral oil to break up the balls. Additionally, some pet food companies manufacture food for cats with recurrent hair or fur ball problems.

Most cats suffer from an occasional hairball, some more than others. Long-haired cats tend to swallow more hair simply because they have more of it, but short-haired breeds get hairballs, too.

Sometimes the hairball gets too big to pass and causes your cat to get sick. In severe cases surgery may be necessary to remove it. If you suspect your cat is having trouble passing a hairball, call your veterinarian, especially if your cat retches for more than three days or if your cat is constipated or refuses food for more than a day.

Brushing and combing will keep your cat from developing painful knots, which are often difficult to remove without the services of a professional groomer. If your cat must be shaved due to excessive knotting, a veterinarian must perform the procedure, and your cat will have to be anesthetized.

You can keep your cat from having a “bad hair day” by regularly brushing and combing his hair. Cats have many types of coats, but all of them need to be brushed and combed.

Feline Hacks: Dealing With Cat Hairballs

If you have a long-haired feline (or really any feline that’s not bald), you’re probably familiar with cat hairballs. While it’s definitely not the most endearing thing about your feline friend, knowing how to deal with the issue can significantly help you out in the long run.

When your cat has a hairball, it can be a little overwhelming because you might think there’s something more serious going on. Being able to recognize the signs can allow you to better help your cat while she works through the issue.

Cats groom themselves often by licking their fur, and this is mainly where the problem starts. If you’ve ever felt your cat’s tongue, it’s a little rough. This is because there are backwards facing barbs on your cat’s tongue that help her groom. These barbs catch stray hairs, but because the barbs face backwards, they don’t allow anything that enters your cat’s mouth to go anywhere but down.

Ingesting the hairs is what causes cat hairballs, or trichobezoar, to develop. All the hair that your cat’s tongue picks up will form a mat or a ball within her digestive system. Shorthairs can suffer from cat hairballs too, the issue is just much less frequent because there is less fur for them to ingest. This is all a normal process that cats go through, and typically your cat will be able to pass the hairball without having an issue.

Unfortunately, as many cat owners who have come home to a hairball on their floor know, this isn’t always true. Every so often, the hairball can cause an issue by blocking parts of your cat’s stomach or digestive tract. The blockage can often cause gastrointestinal distress if it ends up blocking the pathway for food to enter the stomach. As it works its way through your cat’s system, it can also be a cause of constipation.

Once this starts to happen, your cat may exhibit some of the obvious signs of a hairball like vomiting or regurgitation.

Cat Hairballs — What to Watch For

When your cat brings up a hairball, you might hear a sound like a dry cough, or as if your cat has something stuck in the back of her throat. It also may be preceded by fluid or food. Your cat might also experience constipation while her body is dealing with the hairball.

There are several things you can do to help your cat when she has a hairball. From preventing it to helping her pass it, cat hairballs can be a much less stressful experience if you know what you’re dealing with.

The first and most important thing you can do is groom your cat. Frequent grooming is the best way to prevent cat hairballs, because you’ll be doing most of the work and your cat will be ingesting less stray hairs. The more hair your cat has, the more grooming you’re going to have to do. It’s not out of the question to groom your cat once a day in order to keep her from developing hairballs. A daily brushing is also good to keep your cat’s skin healthy and free of any tangles or mats that have developed in her fur.

There are also specific products designed just to help cats pass hairballs. These work as both a laxative and a lubricant to help your cat pass hairballs easily and quickly. They’re made to have a pleasant taste, so your cat won’t be resistant to eating it, and they often come in a paste form. You can feed it to your cat directly, or apply it to her paws to encourage her to lick it off herself.

Many pet food brands also offer specific types that provide protection against hairballs. Typically these foods have a high fiber content in order to help your cat pass any hairballs she might be dealing with. Hairball remedy treats are another way to help your cat pass hairballs. These treats contain mineral oil that works to break up the hairballs in order to prevent blockages. Each of these products are mainly designed for cats who deal with hairballs frequently and need some outside assistance to prevent further problems.

You should have a discussion with your veterinarian to determine if any of these are right for your cat. You should also understand that every cat is different and while one product might work wonders on one cat, it might not make a difference to another. Your veterinarian will be able to help you figure out what the best course of action is.

Life After Death: Caring for the Cat of a Deceased Owner

As our society continues to age, cat ownership must evolve.

Because cats have the ability to provide loving companionship with minimal care requirements, they represent ideal pets for senior citizens. But as the elderly continue to age and, inevitably, pass away, feline deaths may not keep pace. In fact, many cats – with average lifespans of 15 years or more – will outlive their elderly owners.

The fates of hundreds of thousands of pets face uncertainty each year after their owners pass away. Moreover, many elderly individuals will need to relinquish their feline friends sooner rather than later as they transition into assisted living and nursing home arrangements.

But what, then, can be done to care for these displaced cats? How can we ensure they find longterm homes rather than contribute to the stray cat population or, worse yet, meet a fate of euthanasia?

Thankfully, several strong options exist for caring for a cat who’s elderly owner is deceased or no longer able to provide adequate daily care.

Preparation is Key

When possible, prepare in advance for a cat’s eventual life without their original owner. While this may be a difficult subject to broach with an elderly cat owner, it will eliminate various headaches down the road.

Assign a trustee through a living will to be in charge of finding an good home for a feline once a senior citizen owner is no longer able to provide care. It’s imperative that the trustee can assume responsibility for determining the pet’s future when the right time comes.

If possible, take your preparation a step further. Establish a trust to set aside money for funding that cat’s future needs, and document the cat’s medical history and owner’s veterinarian of choice. And if a future caretaker is already known, get that commitment in writing.

Adoption by a Family Member

Generally-speaking, the best outcome for a displaced cat involves adoption by one of the former owner’s family members or friends. This solution provides several key advantages.

First, the family member may already have a degree of familiarity with the cat, and vice-versa. This can prove beneficial, as a period marked by major changes can be taxing on a feline. Additionally, a lost loved one’s cat can serve as a pleasant, nostalgic reminder of that individual, helping family members cope while grieving.

Even if the adopting family already has a pet, this will not necessarily impede the addition of a late relative’s cat. Most cats are capable of successful integration into a pet household, and can rely on their ability to find safe hiding places if necessary.

Have a Backup Plan

Even if you’ve found a caretaker committed to serving as a permanent owner for the displaced cat, it doesn’t hurt to have an understudy waiting in the wings.

The family member who assumes responsibility may have the cat thrust into his or her life unexpectedly as a result of sudden incapacitation or death. Furthermore, that family member may find integration of the displaced cat more challenging than expected, especially if other pets already exist in the new household.

Consequently, it’s worthwhile to have a backup plan in place to support the formal arrangement for future feline care you’ve established.

Aid from Rescue Organizations or Cat Shelters

In some cases, particularly with small families, a replacement cat caretaker in the form of a family member or friend may simply not exist. In this instance, you can consider contacting a rescue organization.

Rescue organizations and cat shelters perform an invaluable service for our society, saving countless displaced animals from homelessness or death. Often run by volunteers and funded by donations, rescue organizations take in pets that have been abused, abandoned, or displaced. These organizations seek foster care until a suitable permanent home can be located.

Shelters are usually run and funded by local governments, operating as a facility that houses homeless pets. Many shelters rely on assistance from rescue groups in attempting to find new owners for displaced pets.

Assistance from Pet Stores and Breeders

Some pet stores and breeders offer a service by which they’ll house a displaced animal until a new owner can be found. These stores and breeders generously assume the costs for caring for this animal and typically offer the pet to a prospective new owner at little or no cost. This scenario is most suitable for younger cats who originated from that pet store or breeder in the first place.

Tips on Sick Cats

Is your cat experiencing any of the following symptoms? If so, for how long? How often? If you consistently observe any of the following signs, that can indicate an unhealthy cat.

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Coughing
  • Trouble urinating
  • Trouble breathing
  • Limping
  • Itching
  • Losing weight
  • Bad breath
  • Lethargy
  • Increased thirst
  • Vaginal discharge
  • Ear discharge or odor

    If your cat is experiencing any of the above signs, call your veterinarian.

  • Tip on Making Sure Your Cat’s Microchip is Working

    Here is a tip from one of our PetPlace.com users:

    It's always a good idea to have your vet check your pets' microchip when you go in for a checkup. There have been instances where the chip has moved.

    Do you have a special pet tip? Click here to submit your own cat tips and we may publish and share them with users!

    Tips on Adopting Kittens

    Most animal behaviorists recommend against adopting a kitten before 12 weeks of age. Kittens need that time to develop socialization skills with their litter mates and mother. Also, reputable breeders don't like to release them before that point. This affords them time to begin the kittens' immunization series, perform different hands-on exercises to prepare them for their eventual home, as well as early trips to the veterinarian.

    For more information, read the story How to Pick the Right Cat For You.

    Tip for Not Declawing Your Cat

    Here is a tip from one of our PetPlace.com users:

    Before you declaw your cat because it has been sharpening its claws on your furniture as well as its scratching posts, try this: Buy a role of adhesive-backed shelf liner (sometime called contact paper). Cut pieces large enough to cover the areas your cat is most likely to shred, remove the backing on the paper, and voila! This is an inexpensive solution to an expensive problem. I've had eight different cats in my household over the years, and none of them scratched through the shelf paper. Shelf liner comes in a variety of colors and patterns or transparent (clear), so you can choose a roll to blend in with your 'decor'. What's more, you have a whole roll, so if guests are coming, just pull off the shelf paper and toss it-you can cut a new piece to stick on after the guests have left.

    Do you have a special pet tip? Click here to submit your own cat tips and we may publish and share it with users!

    Tips on Cat Flea Collars

    This is one vets opinion. Cat flea collars are just about useless. There are better and safer alternatives to flea control.

    If you choose to use a flea collar, make sure it is labeled for cats only. It is very important not to use a dog flea collar on a cat!

    IN my opinion, cat flea collars do little to kill fleas and some of the ingredients can be toxic to some cats. There are safer alternatives to flea collars available on the market for cats. For example, some of the new oral and topical medications can work very well and are safer. Examples of products include: Frontline®, Program® and Capstar®.

    For more information on Cat Flea Control Problems, please read Flea Infestations in Cats.

    Hairball Tip

    Hairballs, also called trichobezoar or fur balls, develop when a cat grooms herself with her tongue and ingests the hair. This hair can form into a mat or a ball within the digestive system. The presence of this foreign material can lead to gastrointestinal symptoms, especially if it obstructs the pathway of food to the stomach. As it makes its way further into your cat's system, it can cause constipation. Frequent grooming, hairball products and special hairball treats can help reduce the incidence of hairballs.

    For more information, please read Dealing With Hairballs.