breed
breed

Cardigan Welsh Corgi

avatarChristy McDowell, LVT, VTS (ECC)

Height10-12"
Weight25 - 35 lbs
TypeHerding
Life Expectancy12 - 16 years
Area of OriginGreat Britain

Energy Level

Playfulness

Friendliness to dogs

Friendliness to strangers

exercise requirements

affection level

friendliness to other pets

watchfulness

Grooming Requirements

Vocality

The easiest way to differentiate between a Cardigan Welsh Corgi and a Pembroke Welsh Corgi is the long tail, since Pembrokes are typically tail-free. The Cardigan was one of the first British Isles breeds. They are known for their energetic and strong personalities.  

Energy Level

Playfulness

Friendliness to dogs

Friendliness to strangers

exercise requirements

affection level

friendliness to other pets

watchfulness

Grooming Requirements

Vocality

Where Are Cardigan Welsh Corgis From?

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi arrived in the British Isles in 1200 B.C., when the Celts of Central Europe traveled to Wales and settled in Cardiganshire. They’re believed to be from the same family as the Dachshund.

Originally, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi protected its owner’s cattle by chasing off predators, but they eventually developed into a herding breed that drove cattle to market. The breed’s popularity expanded beyond Wales in the 1800s, gaining popularity in England before making their way to the states in the 1920s. The Cardigan is much less popular than the Pembroke Welsh Corgi, and they’ve almost disappeared from their native Wales on multiple occasions.

Where Are Cardigan Welsh Corgis From?

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi arrived in the British Isles in 1200 B.C., when the Celts of Central Europe traveled to Wales and settled in Cardiganshire. They’re believed to be from the same family as the Dachshund.

Originally, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi protected its owner’s cattle by chasing off predators, but they eventually developed into a herding breed that drove cattle to market. The breed’s popularity expanded beyond Wales in the 1800s, gaining popularity in England before making their way to the states in the 1920s. The Cardigan is much less popular than the Pembroke Welsh Corgi, and they’ve almost disappeared from their native Wales on multiple occasions.

Care

What Kind of Diet Does a Cardigan Welsh Corgi Need?

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi requires a nutritious diet, but feedings should be monitored closely. This breed is prone to obesity if not given enough exercise. Measure your Cardigan’s meals, and only offer occasional treats as well.

Caring for a Cardigan Welsh Corgi

What Kind of Diet Does a Cardigan Welsh Corgi Need?

How Often Should I Groom My Corgi?

Are Cardigan Welsh Corgis Healthy?

How Easy Is It to Train a Corgi?

How Much Exercise Does a Cardigan Welsh Corgi Need?

What Kind of Diet Does a Cardigan Welsh Corgi Need?

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi requires a nutritious diet, but feedings should be monitored closely. This breed is prone to obesity if not given enough exercise. Measure your Cardigan’s meals, and only offer occasional treats as well.

What Are the Physical Characteristics of a Cardigan Welsh Corgi?

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is low-set with a deep chest. They are long rather than tall. They are alert dogs, but not skittish or overly aggressive. The desired height is 10 – 12 inches at the shoulders and the desired weight is 25 – 35 pounds.

The eyes of a Blue Merle Corgi may be blue, either fully, partially, or unilaterally. They are larger, but not protruding. Ears stand erect, and are suitable for the size of the dog. The nose is black, except in Blue Merles, where partially pigmented noses are permitted. The head is well balanced, yet bulky, with a wide skull.

The body of a Cardigan Welsh Corgi is muscular, long rather than tall, and low to the ground.

The tail should be straight (never curly), carried fairly low, and reach below the hock in length.

The chest is broad. The shoulders are long, laid back, and are of equal length to the upper arms. Dewclaws are usually removed.

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi has a dense and medium length coat, which sheds seasonally. The outer coat is slightly harsh in texture and is never wiry, curly, or silky. All shades of red, brindle, and sable are acceptable. Black with or without tan or brindle points and Blue Merle with or without tan or brindle points are also acceptable.

The thighs are muscular and strong, but not as wide as the shoulders. Removal of the rear dewclaws is expected.

Cardigan Welsh Corgis Facts

1

Blue Merle Cardigan Welsh Corgis should not be bred together. Breeding may result in part of the litter being "double-merle," which typically leads to visual and auditory deficits.

2

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi was called Ci llathaid in the Welsh language, which means "yard long from the nose to the tail."

3

This breed was protected by ancient Welsh law.

Other Breeds to Explore

Australian Shepherd
Choosing a Bearded Collie
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References

  • Morris, Desmond. Dogs: The Ultimate Dictionary of Over 1,000 Dog Breeds. Trafalgar Square, 2002.
  • American Kennel Club. The Complete Dog Book. Random House Digital, Inc., 2006.
  • “Cardigan Welsh Corgi Dog Breed Information.” American Kennel Club, 6 Nov. 2017, www.akc.org/dog-breeds/cardigan-welsh-corgi.

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