A Dogo Argentino stands in a desolate forest.
A Dogo Argentino stands in a desolate forest.

Dogo Argentino

avatarStephanie Lenoir LVT, VTS (ECC)

Height26 - 27"
Weight77 - 99 lbs
TypeWorking
Life Expectancy10 - 11 years
Area of OriginArgentina

Energy Level

Playfulness

Friendliness to dogs

Friendliness to strangers

exercise requirements

affection level

friendliness to other pets

watchfulness

Grooming Requirements

Vocality

The Dogo Argentino is a native breed of Argentina. They are a large and well-muscled dog, boasting exceptional intelligence, strength, and personality. Dogos are excellent family protectors, but caution should be taken around strangers and unfamiliar dogs. They are good with children in their household, but should always be supervised. This is a breed that requires an experienced owner with extensive training expertise.

Energy Level

Playfulness

Friendliness to dogs

Friendliness to strangers

exercise requirements

affection level

friendliness to other pets

watchfulness

Grooming Requirements

Vocality

Where Are Dogos Argentinos From?

Antonio and Augustin Martinez developed the Dogo Argentino to be a superb large game hunter and human protector. In 1925, they created the Dogo by integrating a variety of other breeds, including the Cordoba Fighting Dog, Pointer, Boxer, Great Dane, Bull Terrier, Old English Bulldog, Irish Wolfhound, Dogue de Bordeaux, Great Pyrenees, and Spanish Mastiff.

In 1947, Antonio, who was also a surgeon, published the breed standard in Argentina. The breed was used for many jobs, including drug & bomb detection and police work. In 1970, Dr. Raul Zeballos brought the Dogo to the United States and it was eventually recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2020.

Where Are Dogos Argentinos From?

Antonio and Augustin Martinez developed the Dogo Argentino to be a superb large game hunter and human protector. In 1925, they created the Dogo by integrating a variety of other breeds, including the Cordoba Fighting Dog, Pointer, Boxer, Great Dane, Bull Terrier, Old English Bulldog, Irish Wolfhound, Dogue de Bordeaux, Great Pyrenees, and Spanish Mastiff.

In 1947, Antonio, who was also a surgeon, published the breed standard in Argentina. The breed was used for many jobs, including drug & bomb detection and police work. In 1970, Dr. Raul Zeballos brought the Dogo to the United States and it was eventually recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2020.

Care

How Much Food Should a Dogo Argentino Eat?

The Dogo Argentino is a rather large breed of dog and requires a tremendous amount of healthy food to accommodate their size (up to 4 meals a day). They should be fed puppy food during their first 18 months to ensure proper bone and muscle development. This breed is predisposed to allergies, so consult your veterinarian if any issues arise.

Caring for a Dogo Argentino

How Much Food Should a Dogo Argentino Eat?

How Much Grooming Does a Dogo Argentino Need?

Are Dogos Argentinos Healthy Dogs?

How Much Training Does a Dogo Argentino Need?

How Much Exercise Does a Dogo Argentino Need?

How Much Food Should a Dogo Argentino Eat?

The Dogo Argentino is a rather large breed of dog and requires a tremendous amount of healthy food to accommodate their size (up to 4 meals a day). They should be fed puppy food during their first 18 months to ensure proper bone and muscle development. This breed is predisposed to allergies, so consult your veterinarian if any issues arise.

What Are the Physical Characteristics of a Dogo Argentino?

Dogos Argentinos are an extremely muscular and powerful dog, built to endure the hunt and catch their prey. They resemble a white Pit Bull and possess a square head and black spotting on the nose and around the eyes.

Their almond-shaped eyes are a dark brown to deep black, which befits their intimidating look and figure. The head is large and broad, but slightly narrowed towards the muzzle. Ears are set high on the top of the skull and are typically cropped.

Females Dogos have an average weight of 77 to 88 pounds and are 26 inches tall. Males are a bit larger, boasting an average weight of 88 to 99 pounds and standing 27 inches in height.

Yes, Dogos have tails, which are typically long and carried between the legs.

The Dogo has a thick neck with broad, muscular shoulders. The front legs are straight and provide the breed with an elegant pose.

Dogos are always white, aside from dark patches on the head and face. Their coats should have a clean, glossy sheen. Because of their lightly-colored coats, they are very susceptible to sunburn.

Dogos have short hocks and muscular thighs with medium angulation.

Dogo Argentino Facts

1

Unfortunately, the Dogo Argentino is often negatively associated with dog fighting, which has resulted in them being banned in countries like Denmark, Fiji, and the Ukraine.

2

The Dogo Argentino was bred for big game hunting, specifically animals like wild boar, pumas, and mountain lions.

3

The breed was recently recognized by the AKC in 2020 and is their 195th breed.

Other Breeds to Explore

Great Dane
Boxers - Choosing a Boxer - Dog Breeds
Great Pyrenees

References

  • Morris, Desmond. Dogs: The Ultimate Dictionary of Over 1,000 Dog Breeds. Trafalgar Square, 2002.
  • American Kennel Club. The Complete Dog Book. Random House Digital, Inc., 2006.
  • Wilcox, Bonnie and Chris Walkowicz. The Atlas of Dog Breeds of the World. T.F.H Publications, Inc., 1995.
  • Tips For Taking Care Of Dogo Argentino Pups. AnimalCareTips, 2006.

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