The scrunched-up face of a Pug.
The scrunched-up face of a Pug.

Pug

avatarAlanna Mallory, BS, LVT, VTS (SAIM)

Height10"
Weight14-18 lbs
TypeToy
Life Expectancy12-14 years
Area of OriginChina

Energy Level

Playfulness

Friendliness to dogs

Friendliness to strangers

exercise requirements

affection level

friendliness to other pets

watchfulness

Grooming Requirements

Vocality

The Pug is a playful, even tempered, and devoted breed. The motto of the Pug is multum in parvo, which means "much in little" in Latin, and this breed certainly lives up to that description. Prominent eyes, wrinkled faces, and curly tails are just a few distinctive traits. The Pug enjoys both life in the city and the suburbs and their laid-back temperament makes them an excellent family pet. Their passion for food and some health problems may be this breed's only weaknesses.  

Energy Level

Playfulness

Friendliness to dogs

Friendliness to strangers

exercise requirements

affection level

friendliness to other pets

watchfulness

Grooming Requirements

Vocality

Where Are Pugs From?

The name “Pug” is suggested to have many different origins. In Latin, the word pugnus means fist, which the Pug’s head is thought to resemble. They are also referred to as carlin in France, carlini in Italy, Mops Hund in Germany, Lo-sze in China, and mophand in the Netherlands. The Pug is the largest of the toy breeds and is also a companion animal. They originated in China and have been traced back to the first century B.C. They were royal dogs in their native land and were often gifted to overseas rulers. The oldest breeding records from China include descriptions of Pug-like dogs with both straight and bowed front legs, which may indicate interbreeding with the Pekingese, Japanese Chin, and Shih Tzu. The breeding records also describe fawn, black, and parti-colored coats.

It is believed that Holland was the first European country to acquire a Pug via the Dutch East India Company. In 1688, when William III and Mary II traveled from Holland to Great Britain to begin their reign as King and Queen, they brought their beloved Pugs along with them. The Pugs wore orange ribbons to represent the House of Orange and henceforth, Pugs became a symbol of supporters of the royal family. Black Pugs were not formally introduced until 1877 and almost entirely unknown until 1886, when Britain’s Lady Brassey showed her black Pugs in Maidstone, Kent. The Pug was officially recognized by The American Kennel Club in 1885.

Where Are Pugs From?

The name “Pug” is suggested to have many different origins. In Latin, the word pugnus means fist, which the Pug’s head is thought to resemble. They are also referred to as carlin in France, carlini in Italy, Mops Hund in Germany, Lo-sze in China, and mophand in the Netherlands. The Pug is the largest of the toy breeds and is also a companion animal. They originated in China and have been traced back to the first century B.C. They were royal dogs in their native land and were often gifted to overseas rulers. The oldest breeding records from China include descriptions of Pug-like dogs with both straight and bowed front legs, which may indicate interbreeding with the Pekingese, Japanese Chin, and Shih Tzu. The breeding records also describe fawn, black, and parti-colored coats.

It is believed that Holland was the first European country to acquire a Pug via the Dutch East India Company. In 1688, when William III and Mary II traveled from Holland to Great Britain to begin their reign as King and Queen, they brought their beloved Pugs along with them. The Pugs wore orange ribbons to represent the House of Orange and henceforth, Pugs became a symbol of supporters of the royal family. Black Pugs were not formally introduced until 1877 and almost entirely unknown until 1886, when Britain’s Lady Brassey showed her black Pugs in Maidstone, Kent. The Pug was officially recognized by The American Kennel Club in 1885.

Care

Do Pugs Have Weight Problems?

The Pug thoroughly enjoys food and can easily become overweight. As a brachycephalic breed, they are prone to respiratory abnormalities and obesity can further exacerbate these breathing issues. Monitoring your Pug’s caloric intake and weight can help prevent obesity. Limiting table scraps may seem difficult, due to their adorably wrinkly faces, but it will help maintain a healthy weight.

If your Pug becomes overweight, an appropriate weight management plan should be discussed with your veterinarian.

Caring for a Pug

Do Pugs Have Weight Problems?

Do Pugs Need to Be Groomed?

Do Pugs Have Health Issues?

How to Train a Pug

How Much Exercise Does a Pug Need?

Do Pugs Have Weight Problems?

The Pug thoroughly enjoys food and can easily become overweight. As a brachycephalic breed, they are prone to respiratory abnormalities and obesity can further exacerbate these breathing issues. Monitoring your Pug’s caloric intake and weight can help prevent obesity. Limiting table scraps may seem difficult, due to their adorably wrinkly faces, but it will help maintain a healthy weight.

If your Pug becomes overweight, an appropriate weight management plan should be discussed with your veterinarian.

What Are the Physical Traits of a Pug?

Pugs are essentially a miniature Mastiff that has a square body, with thick, wrinkly skin and a curled tail. Their height ranges from 10 – 11 inches and they weigh 14 – 18 lbs. Pugs can either be lean and leggy or long bodied, muscular, and short legged.

The head of a Pug is large and circular. The eyes are expressive and prominent, globular in shape, and dark colored. The ears are thin and small, with a velvety feel. The wrinkles on their forehead and mask are large and deep. The muzzle is short and blunt, and they have a slight underbite.

The body is short and stocky. Their chest is wide and the ribs should be well defined.

The double-curled and tight tail is considered “perfection” by Pug enthusiasts.

Pug forelegs are of moderate length, strong and straight, and set well underneath the chest.

Pugs come in apricot or silver-fawn (with black masks) and black varieties. Their coat is short, soft, and smooth.

The hind legs are muscular and strong with a moderate bend at the stifle. Their hocks are short and the hind legs should be parallel in appearance from behind. The hindquarters and forequarters should be in balance.

Pug Facts

1

In 1572, William the Silent's (Prince of Orange) life was saved by a pug whose bark warned him of an attack by Spanish troops.

2

A Pug named "Fortune" was the companion of Napoleon's wife, Josephine, and reportedly bit the French leader on their wedding night.

3

The Pug has been the most popular breed in England twice in recorded history (in the middle of the 18th century and mid-Victorian period of the 19th century).

Other Breeds to Explore

Pekingese
French Bulldog
Old English Mastiff

References

  • Morris, Desmond. Dogs: The Ultimate Dictionary of Over 1,000 Dog Breeds. Trafalgar Square, 2002.
  • American Kennel Club. The Complete Dog Book. Random House Digital, Inc., 2006.
  • Wilcox, Bonnie and Chris Walkowicz. The Atlas of Dog Breeds of the World. T.F.H. Publications, Inc., 1995.

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