breed
breed
Height12’’
Weight20-28 Ibs
TypeNon-Sporting
Life Expectancy10-14 years
Area of OriginGreat Britain

Energy Level

Playfulness

Friendliness to dogs

Friendliness to strangers

exercise requirements

affection level

friendliness to other pets

watchfulness

Grooming Requirements

Vocality

The French Bulldog is a popular, charming, and loving companion. They are primarily bred to be lap dogs and provide endless comedy and entertainment with their large "bat-ears" and vivacious personalities. This couch potato is extremely affectionate and the perfect size and temperament for city living, which is why they're one of the most popular breeds in metropolitan areas.

Energy Level

Playfulness

Friendliness to dogs

Friendliness to strangers

exercise requirements

affection level

friendliness to other pets

watchfulness

Grooming Requirements

Vocality

Where Are French Bulldogs From?

French Bulldogs are, in fact, not French in origin, but British. In the early 1850’s, the bulldog was bred to be smaller and serve primarily as an indoor companion. The English city of Nottingham was the center of the lace making industry and the toy bulldog became the mascot for local lace makers.

Due to the birth of the Industrial Revolution, lacemakers relocated from Nottingham to northern France in search of labor opportunities. They brought their tiny bulldogs with them and introduced this companion to French society. The breed became extremely popular in their new home and were bred deliberately to exaggerate the size of their ears. Over several generations of breeding, these little companions developed a variety of skills, including rat hunting.

In the 1890s, the French Bulldog breed was reviewed for membership in the British Kennel club, but was not recognized as a separate breed until 1906 by the Kennel Club in London, under their official name of Bouledogue Français. The French Bulldog was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1898.

Where Are French Bulldogs From?

French Bulldogs are, in fact, not French in origin, but British. In the early 1850’s, the bulldog was bred to be smaller and serve primarily as an indoor companion. The English city of Nottingham was the center of the lace making industry and the toy bulldog became the mascot for local lace makers.

Due to the birth of the Industrial Revolution, lacemakers relocated from Nottingham to northern France in search of labor opportunities. They brought their tiny bulldogs with them and introduced this companion to French society. The breed became extremely popular in their new home and were bred deliberately to exaggerate the size of their ears. Over several generations of breeding, these little companions developed a variety of skills, including rat hunting.

In the 1890s, the French Bulldog breed was reviewed for membership in the British Kennel club, but was not recognized as a separate breed until 1906 by the Kennel Club in London, under their official name of Bouledogue Français. The French Bulldog was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1898.

Care

Do French Bulldogs Have Allergies?

French Bulldogs are prone to inflammatory bowel disease and food allergies. They can develop food allergies to dairy products, beef, chicken, lamb, fish, corn, wheat, soy, and a variety of ingredients found in dog food. If your dog has a food allergy, you may notice vomiting, gas, diarrhea, excessive itching, and gastrointestinal distress. Please seek veterinary diagnosis and testing to determine which diet best suits your pet.

Caring for a French Bulldog

Do French Bulldogs Have Allergies?

How to Groom a French Bulldog

Do French Bulldogs Have Health Problems?

Can You Train a French Bulldog?

How Much Should a French Bulldog Exercise?

Do French Bulldogs Have Allergies?

French Bulldogs are prone to inflammatory bowel disease and food allergies. They can develop food allergies to dairy products, beef, chicken, lamb, fish, corn, wheat, soy, and a variety of ingredients found in dog food. If your dog has a food allergy, you may notice vomiting, gas, diarrhea, excessive itching, and gastrointestinal distress. Please seek veterinary diagnosis and testing to determine which diet best suits your pet.

What Are the Traits of a French Bulldog?

The French Bulldog is a miniaturized, bat-eared bulldog with a height of only 12 inches and weight between 20 – 28 lb. They have a stocky build, diminutive size, flat/wrinkled face, and oversized ears. Their top lip overhangs the bottom lip for a characteristic underbite.

French Bulldogs’ heads are rather large and square in shape. Their eyes are dark in color, set apart, and sunken deep in the skull. They are round in shape, but not bulging. Frenchies’ ears have a distinctive “bat” size and shape.

The body is short with a broad, deep chest. Frenchies are very muscular and should not be overweight, as this can exacerbate their underlying health problems.

The tail is screwed or straight, short, and has a thick base. When grooming a Frenchie, ensure that the tight wrinkle at the tail base is cleaned thoroughly, as this can be an area for bacterial and yeast overgrowth.

Frenchies’ forelegs are shorter than their haunch, strong, and set apart.

The French Bulldog comes in a variety of colors, including brindle, fawn, white, and black.

Hind legs are longer and stronger than their counterparts in the front, which places the loin region above the shoulder.

French Bulldog Facts

1

The French Bulldog was popularized as a radical fashion accessory in Paris. They were at first made famous by the Belles de Nuit (Ladies of the Night), where they were paraded proudly up and down the Champs-Elysees.

2

French artists Edgar Degas and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec famously immortalized the breed in their paintings of Parisian social life.

3

Tragically, a French Bulldog was the only pet to perish during the sinking of the Titanic in 1912.

Other Breeds to Explore

English Bulldog
Boston Terriers - Choosing a Boston Terrier - Dog Breeds
Boxers - Choosing a Boxer - Dog Breeds

References

  • Gough, Alex, Alison Thomas, and Dan O’Neill. Breed Predispositions to Disease in Dogs and Cats. John Wiley & Sons, 2018.
  • Morris, Desmond. Dogs: The Ultimate Dictionary of Over 1,000 Dog Breeds. Trafalgar Square, 2002.
  • American Kennel Club. The Complete Dog Book. Random House Digital, Inc., 2006.
  • Ward, Greg. The Rough Guide to the Titanic. Penguin, 2012.

Get the best of PetPlace straight to your inbox.

By signing up, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.